Trending March 2024 # Root Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 Wi # Suggested April 2024 # Top 10 Popular

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  WARNING!

Warranty may be void of your device if you follow the procedures given on this page.

You only are responsible for your device. We won’t be liable if any damage occurs to your device and/or its components.

  GUIDE: ROOT SAMSUNG GALAXY TAB PRO 8.4 WiFi SM-T320

Before you begin with the instructions below, make sure your android device is adequately charged — at least 50% battery of the device.

  STEP 0: CHECK DEVICE MODEL NO.

To make sure your device is eligible with this, you must first confirm its model no. in ‘About device’ option under Settings. Another way to confirm model no. is by looking for it on the packaging box of your device. It must be SM-T320!

This guide is specifically for the Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 WiFi with model no. SM-T320. Do not use the procedures discussed here on any other device of Samsung or any other company. You have been warned!

  STEP 1: BACKUP YOUR DEVICE

Back up important data and stuff before you start playing around here as there are chances you might lose your apps and app-data (app settings, game progress, etc.), and in rare case, files on the internal memory, too.

For help on Backup and Restore, check out our exclusive page on that linked right below.

► ANDROID BACK UP AND RESTORE GUIDE: APPS AND TIPS

  STEP 2: INSTALL LATEST DRIVER

You must have proper and working driver installed on your windows computer to be able to successfully root your Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4.

In case you’re not sure, follow the link below for a definitive guide for installing driver for your Samsung device on your computer.

► SAMSUNG DEVICES DRIVERS INSTALLATION GUIDE

   STEP 3: INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

  DOWNLOADS

Download the CF Auto Root file given below and transfer it to a separate folder on your computer (just to keep things tidy, that is).

  CF AUTO ROOT FILE   STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE

Important Note: Backup important files stored on internal SD card of your device, so that in case a situation arises requiring you to do a factory reset after flashing the CF Auto Root, which might delete internal sd card too, your files will remain safe on PC.

Extract/Unzip the CF-Auto-Root file, CF-Auto-Root-mondrianwifi-mondrianwifixx-smt320.zip, on your computer (using 7-zip free software, preferably). You’ll get the following files:

Odin3-v1.85.exe

Odin3.ini

CF-Auto-Root-mondrianwifi-mondrianwifixx-smt320.tar.md5

Disconnect the Galaxy Tab Pro from PC if it is connected.

Boot your Galaxy Tab Pro into Download Mode:

Power off your phone first and wait for 6-7 seconds after display is off.

Press and hold these 3 buttons together until you see Warning! screen: Volume Down + Power + Home.

If you don’t get the Added! message, here are some 

troubleshooting tips

:

Make sure you have installed driver for Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 as said above in Step 2 about drivers above this guide.

If you have already installed driver, then uninstall them and reinstall back.

Connect using a different USB port on your PC.

Try a different USB cable. The original cable that came with your phone should work best, if not, try any other cable that’s new and of good quality.

Reboot your phone and PC and then try again.

Load the firmware file (extracted in Step 1) into Odin as instructed below:

Now in the Option section of Odin, make sure that Re-Partition box is unchecked. (Auto Reboot and F. Reset Time boxes remain checked, while all other boxes remain unchecked.)

Double check the above two steps.

If you see FAIL message instead of the PASS in Odin’s top left box, that’s a problem. Try this now: disconnect your Galaxy Tab Pro from PC, close Odin, remove phone’s battery and put it back inside in 3-4 seconds, open Odin and then repeat from Step 2 of this guide again.

Also, If device is Stuck at setup connection or on any other process, then too, try this: disconnect your Galaxy Tab Pro from PC, close Odin, remove phone’s battery and put it back inside in 3-4 seconds, open Odin and then repeat from Step 2 of this guide again.

NOTE: It may happen that your phone doesn’t automatically boot into recovery and root your phone. In that case follow the following above procedure except that in Step 7, Auto Reboot option is un-checked and then the instructions below:

Pull out the battery and re-insert it after few seconds.

Boot your Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 WiFi into Recovery Mode: Press and hold these 3 buttons together: Volume Up + Power + Home.

Now, this will start the rooting process and will reboot the phone automatically when the process is done.

FEEDBACK US!

It was easy to root your Galaxy Tab Pro with CF Auto Root tool, right?  Let us know how you plan to use root privileges on your Galaxy Tab Pro.

Your suggestions and queries, if any, are most welcomed!

You're reading Root Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 Wi

Root Samsung Galaxy Exhibit Sgh

  WARNING!

Warranty may be void of your device if you follow the procedures given on this page.

You only are responsible for your device. We won’t be liable if any damage occurs to your device and/or its components.

  GUIDE: ROOT SAMSUNG GALAXY EXHIBIT SGH-T599

Before you begin with the instructions below, make sure your android device is adequately charged — at least 50% battery of the device.

  STEP 0: CHECK DEVICE MODEL NO.

Please know that this page is exclusively meant for Samsung Galaxy Exhibit. Do not use the procedures discussed here on any other device of Samsung or any other company. You have been warned!

  STEP 1: BACKUP YOUR DEVICE

Back up important data and stuff before you start playing around here as there are chances you might lose your apps and app-data (app settings, game progress, etc.), and in rare case, files on the internal memory, too.

For help on Backup and Restore, check out our exclusive page on that linked right below.

► ANDROID BACK UP AND RESTORE GUIDE: APPS AND TIPS

  STEP 2: INSTALL LATEST DRIVER

You must have proper and working driver installed on your windows computer to be able to successfully root your Samsung Galaxy Exhibit.

In case you’re not sure, follow the link below for a definitive guide for installing driver for your Samsung device on your computer.

► SAMSUNG DEVICES DRIVERS INSTALLATION GUIDE

   STEP 3: INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

  DOWNLOADS

Download the files given below and transfer it to a separate folder on your computer (just to keep things tidy, that is).

  FIRMWARE FILE   WIPE FILE   ODIN FILE   STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE

Important Note: Backup important files stored on internal SD card of your device, so that in case a situation arises requiring you to do a factory reset after flashing with Odin, which might delete internal sd card too, your files will remain safe on PC.

Extract/Unzip the Odin file, Odin_v3.09.zip on your computer (using 7-zip free software, preferably). You’ll get the following files:

Odin3 v3.09.exe

Odin3.ini

Extract the chúng tôi file from the T599-Pre-rooted.zip into the same folder where the Odin was extracted.

Disconnect the Galaxy Exhibit from PC if it is connected.

Boot your Samsung Galaxy Exhibit into Download Mode:

Power off your phone first and wait for 6-7 seconds after display is off

Press and hold these 3 buttons together until you see Warning! screen: Volume Down + Power + Home

Press Volume Up now to continue to Download Mode

If you don’t get the Added! message, here are some troubleshooting tips:

Make sure you have installed driver for Galaxy Exhibit as said above.

If you have already installed driver, then uninstall them and re-install back.

Connect using a different USB port on your PC.

Try a different USB cable. The original cable that came with your phone should work best, if not, try any other cable that’s new and of good quality.

Reboot phone and PC and then try again.

Load the firmware file (extracted in Step 1) into Odin as instructed below:

Now in the Option section of Odin, make sure that Re-Partition box is unchecked. (Auto Reboot and F. Reset Time boxes remain checked, while all other boxes remain unchecked.)

Double check the above two steps. (Step 7 and Step 8)

When you get PASS! message, your device will restart automatically. You can then disconnect your phone from PC.

If you see FAIL message instead of the PASS in Odin’s top left box, that’s a problem. Try this now: disconnect your Galaxy Exhibit from PC, close Odin, remove phone’s battery and put it back inside in 3-4 seconds, open Odin and then repeat from Step 3 of this guide again.

Also, If device is Stuck at setup connection or on any other process, then too, try this: disconnect your Galaxy Exhibit from PC, close Odin, remove phone’s battery and put it back inside in 3-4 seconds, open Odin and then repeat from Step 3 of this guide again.

Similarly, flash the t599_wipe.tar.md5 file obtained from the t599_wipe.zip in the AP box of Odin. (This is just an empty cache file which is used to break the bootlops if you can’t get to recovery)

FEEDBACK US!

It was easy to root your Galaxy Exhibit, right?  Let us know how you plan to use root privileges on your Galaxy Exhibit.

Your suggestions and queries, if any, are most welcomed!

Samsung Galaxy Tab: Which Carrier Will You Pick?

Let’s face it; compared to current Apple iPad users, prospective Samsung Galaxy Tab owners are going to suffer from an embarrassment of choices. Not only will Samsung’s new 7-inch tablet device offer features the iPad doesn’t such as mobile video chat, Adobe Flash support, and high-definition video playback at 1080p resolution (the iPad supports 720p), but it offers a choice of carriers.

That may sound great, but with great choice comes great responsibility (or so I’ve been told). Luckily for you, PC World regularly tests each carrier’s 3G network for speed and reliability across the nation. PC World’s most recent 3G network tests included “51,000 separate tests covering 850 square miles of wireless cell coverage servicing 7 million wireless subscribers.”

So let’s take a look at some cold, hard numbers for major cities in each region of the United States to see how the big four–AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon–measure up.

But First, a Caveat About PC World’s 3G Network Tests

PC World and our testing partner, Novarum used two types of tests. As PC World Senior Associate Editor Mark Sullivan explains, PC World “connected to the 3G network [in each city] via both laptops and smartphones. The laptop tests accurately measured the capacity and performance potential of a given network, while the smartphone tests approximated the real-world connection speeds users of these popular devices might experience, given the less-powerful processors and 3G radios that the devices contain.”

So, remember that the laptop test only shows a network’s potential, while the smartphone test is the closest approximation of real-world results you might experience. For more information about PC World’s network tests check out the complete 3G reliability and network speed results, or jump to this tutorial on “How PC World Conducted its Network Tests.”

East Coast: New York City Midwest: Chicago

AT&T and Verizon also tied for the most reliable Chicago network in PC World’s laptop test. When it came to network speed, AT&T blew away Verizon with an average 1568 kbps down and 831 kbps up. Verizon, by comparison, supported 886 kbps down and 425 kbps up.

South: New Orleans

Moving south, Verizon won the most reliable network in the Big Easy’s laptop test, but AT&T had the fastest download speed at 1665 kbps down and 801 kbps up. In the smartphone challenge, AT&T was the most reliable at 93 percent, but AT&T’s 1160 kbps download speed couldn’t match Verizon’s average at 1380 kbps.

Orlando’s results were similar to New Orleans in terms of reliability and fastest speeds.

Southwest: Phoenix

T-Mobile was the big winner in Phoenix, tying with AT&T at 100 percent reliability on the laptop test. But T-Mobile won top marks in the smartphone reliability test, scoring 97 percent. Its download speeds were also the best, with T-Mobile in Phoenix offering 1201 kbps on the laptop test and 909 kbps in the smartphone challenge. But if you’re going to be uploading a lot of photos or video over 3G in Phoenix then AT&T might be the network for you. AT&T’s laptop and smartphone upload tests were tops at 697 kbps and 211 kbps respectively.

West: Denver West Coast: San Francisco

The people of San Francisco often complain about their cell phone service, arguing that the hills in and around the city make it a nightmare for cellular network providers. Looking at the test results you can see why the people of San Francisco often complain.

Pacific Northwest: Portland

That’s a quick look at the network speed numbers across the U.S. based on PC World’s most recent network speed and reliability tests. But don’t forget that network speed and reliability, while important, is just one factor to consider.

All prices being equal, however, which carrier would you pick for your Galaxy Tab?

Connect with Ian on Twitter (@ianpaul).

Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro Review: A Little Bit Of Everything

Priced at just $199.99, the Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro are worthy options for Samsung-focused Android users who want a little bit of everything packed into their wireless earbuds, whether it’s attractive audio performance, excellent waterproofing, a comfortable fit, or active noise cancellation. With their unique voice detection feature and impressive waterproofing, they even manage to come out ahead of other earbuds aimed at a similarly wide market. Unfortunately, you’ll need to be fully committed to the Samsung ecosystem if you want to get the most out of them, but their versatility makes them a solid choice for anyone with an Android device.

The right look

Ben Norris / IDG

And I do mean “perfect.” Whether I was jogging up San Francisco hills or playing tennis, they refused to budge and continued to feel comfortable despite not leaving my ears for a couple of hours. Most impressively, the Galaxy Buds Pro achieve this without stabilizing fins. Nor did I have to worry about them getting wet, thanks to their phenomenal IPX7 water-resistance rating. That not only keeps them safe from any sweat during a workout, but it also allowed me to keep them in while walking through a February rainstorm. That puts them way ahead of competing earbuds like the AirPods Pro and the Jabra Elite 85t, both of which only have an IPX4 rating.

The controls are comfortably familiar to anyone who’s used Samsung’s other earbuds: Tap once to play or pause a song, tap twice to skip to the next song, and tap three times to jump back to the previous song. In the Galaxy Wearable app, you can choose to tie the long press to the ambient mode, your choice of voice assistant, or the volume. 

In practice, though, the controls could use some work. For instance, merely adjusting the buds themselves can be easily registered as a command to play or pause the music. And while the play/pause command works well enough, the double and triple taps frequently only register as single taps. It’s the most madding aspect of the Galaxy Buds Pro experience, and I was happy to see that the Galaxy Wearable app at least allows you to turn off touch controls altogether.

Face the music

If there’s any single reason to buy these buds over other multi-featured wireless competitors, it’s the decently deep bass and clear treble they offer, thanks in part to the 11-millimeter woofer and 6.5mm tweeter in each bud. Take Fleetwood Mac’s “Dreams”—with the Galaxy Buds Pro, the well-known thumpin’ bassline still packs a punch without drowning out the clarity of Stevie Nicks’ vocals. The same goes for Billie Eilish’s “Bad Guy,” which sounds reasonably close to what I hear when I listen to it with some over-ear headphones. I soon found myself turning to the Galaxy Buds Pro just for the pleasure of listening to music through them.

The Galaxy Buds sound great straight out of the box (even on an iPhone, where they’re not supported by any software), but for the best experience, you should head to the Galaxy Wearable app and choose from one of the six preset options. Mind you, the experience isn’t universally satisfying: Some tracks have a tad too much brightness. Even so, the audio is far more smartly balanced than what I’m used to from earbuds, and I’d be happy if the Galaxy Buds Pro were the only buds I had for music.

Half-canceled noise

It’s a good thing that the music quality is so remarkable, as it does a lot to make up for the Galaxy Buds Pro’s merely adequate active noise-canceling performance. The Buds Pro do a slightly better job of muffling the world around you than the Galaxy Buds Live, but you’re better off sticking with Sony’s WF-1000XM3 or Apple’s AirPods Pro if you’re in search of good ANC above all else. Samsung lets you switch between “high” and “low” ANC performance, but I tended to keep it on high as that was the only mode that adequately masked sounds like my desk fan,or passing cars outside my window, or even the wind. It’s strong enough that I could clearly tell the ANC was on, but not strong enough that I’d like to take them with me on an airplane. (Times being what they are, I didn’t have an opportunity to test this.)

Also impressive is the “voice detect” feature, which lowers the volume and switches from ANC to ambient mode when the Galaxy Buds Pro sense that you’re talking. The effect persists for around 10 seconds, which is usually enough to hear a reply from whoever you were speaking with. I wish more earbuds had this, as it’s one less reason to reach up and fiddle with the controls. And fortunately, you can disable voice detect in the Samsung Wearable app if you’re fond of singing along to your music.

Battery

Ben Norris / IDG

Dropping them in the charging case nets you an extra 18 hours of play if you keep ANC active, while keeping it off boosts that number to 28 hours. The case itself is an adorably small, square thing that slipped neatly into my jeans pocket and supports both USB-C and Qi wireless charging.

No other Samsung earbuds include such an impressive collection of features in one package. Unfortunately, no other Samsung earbuds so fully push users into the Samsung ecosystem. If you’re an Android user who doesn’t have a Samsung phone, you won’t be able to use nifty features like the ability to automatically switch pairing from a Samsung phone to a Samsung tablet (depending on which one you’re using at a time). You also won’t be able to use hands-free voice-assistant activation with Bixby, although you can still use either Google Assistant or Alexa through the touch controls. Samsung even now has a quick-pairing feature that (greatly) resembles Apple’s. Just hold your Galaxy Buds Pro charging case near your Samsung phone with the lid open, and the prompt to pair them will immediately pop up.

The Galaxy Buds Pro also support Samsung’s 3D Audio feature, which riffs on the spatial audio Apple introduced for the AirPods Pro late last year. If you’re watching a film that supports Dolby surround sound, the Galaxy Buds Pro will recreate some of that experience through mere earbuds. Or so I hear. 3D Audio is only available on the Galaxy S21 and not on the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra used for this review. I don’t think this should dissuade anyone from buying these buds, but it’s a reminder that you’ll get the most out of them if you’re specifically a Samsung user.

Bottom line

Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Vs Huawei P30 Pro: Which One Is Right For You?

Let’s start with the new Galaxy Notes. The “true” Galaxy Note, that succeeds the Galaxy Note 9, is actually the Galaxy Note 10 Plus. In fact, Samsung would have been better off naming these phones the Galaxy Note 10 and Note 10 Lite. But everyone’s launching Pro and Plus iterations, so it’s no surprise that Samsung followed suit.

Samsung Galaxy Note 10: Let’s talk about headphone jacks

News

Samsung certainly goes all out with the Galaxy Note 10 Plus. It comes with a 6.8-inch display with a QHD+ resolution and curved edges that are even more prominent this time around. The punch hole camera makes its way over from the Galaxy S line, but it’s now centered and smaller. Under the hood is the Snapdragon 855 or the Exynos 9825 chipset depending on the market, and 12GB of RAM. 256GB or 512GB of high-speed UFS 3.0 memory is available that can be expanded with a microSD card.

Apart from the design and the processing package, the Galaxy Note 10 doesn’t bring as much to the table. The smaller 6.3-inch display has a lower Full HD+ resolution. It comes with “only” 8GB of RAM and 256GB of UFS 3.0 memory, with no higher RAM or storage options available. Surprisingly, the microSD slot is exclusive to the Plus edition too. Making a rather contentious choice, Samsung has unfortunately decided to remove the headphone jack from both phones.

Keeping everything running on the Note 10 Plus and Note 10 are 4,300mAh and 3,500mAh respectively. They support fast charging (45W for the Plus and 25W for the regular) and fast wireless charging (15W for the Plus and 12W for the smaller phone). The reverse wireless charging feature is available with both.

HUAWEI EMUI 10 hands-on impressions: Snappy and subtly improved

Features

The phone runs EMUI 9.1 based on Android 9 Pie. EMUI has evolved from the iOS clone it used to be to a feature-rich and well-designed user interface. It’s chock full of features of course, with everything from a way to keep specific files and apps locked to a turbo gaming mode. You can find out more about everything EMUI has to offer here.

Galaxy Note 10 vs HUAWEI P30 Pro: And the winner is…

Usually, Samsung’s Galaxy Notes have no trouble running over the competition, but it’s certainly closer now than it has ever been. This actually has more to do with how far HUAWEI has come and not that Samsung has fallen behind in any way.

That said, I’d still give the leg up to the Samsung Galaxy Note 10 series in this comparison. The Galaxy Note 10 Plus, in particular, impresses in every way. It doesn’t get any better in terms of raw power, Samsung’s displays and cameras are going to be outstanding as always, and something like the S Pen isn’t found with any other high-end offering.

Things are a lot more even when the Galaxy Note 10 is pit against the HUAWEI P30 Pro. Full HD+ screens and the same RAM and storage (but UFS 3.0 with the Samsung). Again, the unique proposition here is the S Pen, but if you’re okay without it, the HUAWEI P30 Pro is equally worth considering. The HUAWEI P30 Pro is slightly cheaper than both though.

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ Review

Our Verdict

With more memory and excellent battery life the Galaxy S6 Edge+ is a powerful phone and a great choice if you want a large screen. However, it’s expensive, unwieldy and Samsung has dropped the IR blaster and hardly added anything to the edge screen. With the regular S6 available for less than £340 it’s a no brainer.

Samsung made a splash in the smartphone market with the curved screen Galaxy S6 Edge. Well there’s an even bigger model now so here’s our full Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ review. Also see: Best new phones 2024 and Samsung Galaxy S7 release date, price and specs rumours.

The S6 Edge+ was announced in August at Samsung’s Unpacked 2024 event along with the Galaxy Note 5. This would normally be launched in September at IFA but it was seemingly brought forward to avoid a clash with the iPhone 6S – and other rivals in Berlin.

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ review: Price and competition

The original Galaxy S6 Edge was one of the most expensive phones we’ve ever seen at launch price. Well the Edge+ beat it with Samsung initially selling it at £749.

For a while it was reduced to a cheaper price than the smaller Edge at £599 but it’s now £629 from the official Samsung store. That’s not too bad but it’s still one of the most expensive phones around. However, head over to Amazon and you can pick one up for just £519, a relative bargain.

That’s £100 cheaper than the iPhone 6S which comes with half the storage but you need to consider that the Galaxy S6 can be purchased for under £340 which can only be described as a bargain.

See also: Samsung Galaxy S6+ release date, price and specs.

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ review: Design and build

There’s not a great deal to say about the design and build of the Galaxy S6 Edge+ since it is really just a bigger version of the original model. It retains the same look and feel compromising of a rounded metal frame and glass on the front and back.

It’s one of the most stylish phones around but we haven’t found it as comfortable as the regular Galaxy S6 due to the slightly sharp metal running down either side in order to house the curved edges of the screen – this hasn’t changed much on the Edge+. It’s still thin at 6.9mm but the Edge+ model being even larger makes it all the more unwieldy.

Despite increasing the screen size, Samsung has managed to make the Edge+ 0.1mm thinner than the Edge. There’s a larger battery too and yet the phone is only around 20g heavier. This is some impressive engineering from Samsung.

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ review: Hardware and specs

As alluded to, the Galaxy S6 Edge+ is larger than the original model. If you thought a 5.1in screen was a bit small, the Note range is no longer your only option if you’re a Samsung devotee. The Edge+ features a 5.7in display which matches that of the new Galaxy Note 5 – it’s quickly becoming the standard size for larger phones with the new Nexus 6P also offering this screen size. Also see: 100 funny things to ask S Voice

The display still uses Samsung’s Super AMOLED technology and uses a Quad HD resolution (1440 x 2560). This does mean a drop in pixel density from 577- to 518ppi but we’re talking seriously high numbers here so it’s still awesomely crisp.

Also see: Best smartphones 2024.

The Galaxy S6 Edge+ is one of a handful of phones announced with 4G of RAM which is plenty of memory – an extra 1GB compared to the Edge which power users may find helpful. On the storage front you might be sad to hear there’s still no Micro-SD card slot and the 128GB model has been dropped from the line-up, leaving just 32- and 64GB choices. As mentioned earlier, getting 32GB as standard is good when compared with devices like the iPhone 6S.

What’s even more impressive than the above numbers is the battery life on offer here. In our test the Galaxy S6 Edge+ lastest a whopping eight hours and 39 minutes with a score of 5192. The nearest contenter to date is the Honor 7 which managed just over seven hours.

The larger physical size means there’s room for a 3000mAh battery inside and the Edge+ also offers wireless charging which is something we always want to see from a high-end handset.

We didn’t think Samsung would drop any of its usual extra features so while the Galaxy S6 Edge+ has a fingerprint scanner in the home button and a heart rate monitor, the IR blaster has been dropped with the firm promoting new features such as ‘Live Broadcast’ although we don’t really see the need for this with apps like Periscope. There’s also 11ac Wi-Fi, NFC, Bluetooth 4.1 with aptX, GPS and 4G LTE support.

With such high-end specs on the existing Galaxy S6 models, it’s not really a shock that things haven’t changed for the Edge+. This means there are still top-notch cameras at 16Mp at the rear with optical image stabilisation (it still sticks out a few millimetres but is one of the best on any smartphone), a single LED flash and support for 4K video at 30fps. There’s also still a decent 5Mp camera at the front.

With so many specs remaining the same, the key difference is the screen size and battery life (although more memory is welcome and it’s a shame to see the IR blaster gone) here so Samsung is delivering for all of you out there with a craving for an S6 Edge in a larger model.

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+ review: Software

The Galaxy S6 Edge+ comes pre-loaded with Android 5.1.1 Lollipop and Samsung’s own TouchWiz interface – as you would expect.

Unfortunately, not much has changed but you can position the tab with with to access the People Edge where is most comfortable on the edge. There’s also the added feature of accessing your most used apps with via the People Edge on top of contacts.

We were hoping for more.

There’s little in TouchWiz that’s stock Android, it’s really just the recent apps menu. Otherwise Samsung has opted for its own way of doing things. That’s fine for fans of the UI but others may be put off.

Bloatware is much less of an issue these days but the Edge+ comes with a number of apps which can’t be uninstalled. This includes a folder full of Microsoft apps and Samsung’s own such as S Health and S Voice.

Specs Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+: Specs

Android 5.1 Lollipop

5.7in Super AMOLED dual edge screen Quad HD (1440 x2560)

Exynos 7420 Octa-core processor

32/64GB storage

4GB RAM

16Mp rear camera with OIS

5Mp front camera

Heart rate monitor

Fingerprint scanner

NFC

GPS

11ac Wi-Fi

Bluetooth with atpX

3000mAh battery

6.9 mm

153g

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