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PostgreSQL INSERT statement

In PostgreSQL, the insert statement helps insert a new row or row into the table. You can insert rows specified by value expressions, zero, or multiple rows resulting from the query.

Syntax of PostgreSQL INSERT INTO INSERT INTO TABLE_NAME (column1, column2, ...columnN) VALUES (value1, value2,...valueN);

You can see in the above syntax column 1 to N are the names of the columns in the table into which you wanted to insert data. The target column needs to list in any specific order. The values supplied by the query or values clause is either the corresponding values for the columns.

Once the query is executed, you can see the output message.

Insert oid 1

This output message will be displayed if only a single row is inserted, oid is the numeric OID assigned to the inserted row.

Example of PostgreSQL Insert into Table

Consider the following table, “tutorials,” with two columns.

And no constraints

Here, are steps for PostgreSQL insert into table:

Step 1) Inserting a row into

INSERT INTO tutorials(id, tutorial_name) VALUES (1, 'postgre');

NOTE: Only the characters or date values need to be enclosed with single quotes when inserting a row.

Step 2) However, If you insert data into all the columns, you can omit the column names. The same insert statement can also be written as,

INSERT INTO tutorials VALUES (1, 'postgre');

Step 3) The data values are listed in the order as the columns appear in the table, separated by commas.

The above syntax has an issue which you need to know the order of the columns in the table. To overcome this problem, you can also list the columns explicitly.

For example, both below-given commands have the same effect as displayed below:

INSERT INTO tutorials(id, tutorial_name) VALUES (1, 'postgre'); INSERT INTO tutorials(tutorial_name, id) VALUES ('postgre',1);

Step 4) In this example, you can see that if you do not have values for all the columns, you can omit some of them.

In that case, the columns will be automatically filled with their default values if specified.

INSERT INTO tutorials(id) VALUES (5);

Step 5) You can also request default values for individual columns or the entire row:

INSERT INTO tutorials(id, tutorial_name) VALUES (1, DEFAULT); INSERT INTO tutorials DEFAULT VALUES;

Step 6) You can multiple rows with the just single command:

INSERT INTO tutorials(id, tutorial_name) VALUES (1, 'postgre'), (2, 'oracle'), (3, 'mysql'), (4, 'mongo');

Step 7) In PostgreSQL, it is also to insert the result of a query which might be no rows, one row, or multiple rows:

INSERT INTO tutorials (id, tutorial_name) SELECT id, tutorial_name FROM tutorials WHERE tutorial_name = 'mysql';

PostgreSQL Insert statement using pgAdmin

Here, are steps to Insert statement using pgAdmin in Postgre SQL

Step 1) In the object tree

Select Scripts

INSERT Script

Step 2) In the Insert Panel

Edit the Query

Observe the output

Summary:

Code/Parameter/Tip Description

VALUES (value1, value2,…valueN); Used to insert values into a table

INSERT INTO tutorials(tutorial_name, id) VALUES (‘postgre’,1); Order of columns is not important. Both will have the same effect.

INSERT INTO tutorials VALUES (1, ‘postgre’); If you are providing values for all columns, no need to specify

WHERE tutorial_name = ‘mysql’; You can specify single or multiple subqueries referenced by name in the INSERT query.

DEFAULT VALUES Use of this clause to fill all columns with their default values.

expression A value and expression which should be assigned to the corresponding column.

omeDEFAULT The default clause is used when the corresponding column is filled with its default value.

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How A Google Docs Table Of Contents Works

Whether you’re writing your first novel, or an essay paper for college, a Google Docs table of contents will help you keep things organized.

When you insert a table of contents in Google Docs, it updates automatically depending on how you format and structure your document. As you change the document, the table of contents will update every time you refresh an update.

Table of Contents

In this article, you’ll learn how to add a table of contents to your document and how to make sure it stays updated.

Creating a Google Docs Table of Contents

As you’re writing your document, you’re creating your table of contents. Each header you add becomes another section in the table. Every subheader becomes a subsection as well.

All you have to do to get started is create the first header, highlight it, and then select the Normal text dropdown to choose your top level header style.

Either way, once you’re finished, inserting the table of contents into your document is simple. Just place the cursor where you’d like the Google Docs table of contents to go. Next, select Insert from the menu, and select Table of contents. 

In the submenu that comes up, you’ll see two choices.

How do you choose? If you’re planning on delivering your document in printed format, then you should opt for the page numbers option. If you’re sending it or sharing it electronically, then the blue links option is the way to go.

Once you choose an option, the Google Docs table of contents will appear in the document itself.

Google Docs Table of Contents Updates

As you can see, the table of contents formats itself according to how you’ve structured your document. 

Top level headers (whether you start with H1 or H2) are flush with the left margin. Next level headers will be indented, and so on.

One thing you may notice as you start writing your document is that if you update any existing headers or add any new ones, the table of contents won’t update automatically.

When you select this refresh icon, you’ll see the table of contents update to incorporate all of the changes you’ve made to the document.

Either method makes your TOC match the current structure of your working document.

Alternatively, you can view the document outline (which looks just like your Google Docs table of contents) in the left sidebar. To do this, just select the Show document outline icon at the upper left corner of the document. 

This will display the document outline on the left even as you’re scrolling through your document. You can select any section (header) in this outline to jump to that section of the document.

Formatting Google Docs Table of Contents

While the Google Docs TOC is inserted using the standard text format of your document, you can update it if you want to.

Just highlight the entire table of contents, then select Format from the menu, select Text, and select Size.

From the submenu, you can choose to either select Increase font size or Decrease font size.

This will update the entire TOC to the new formatting setting you’ve selected.

The Search & Navigate Add-On

Once you’ve installed the addon, select Add-ons from the menu, select Search & Navigate, and select Start.

This launches a panel on the right that you can use to navigate through your document using the same headers that are in your table of contents.

The reason this is a bit more useful than the regular TOC navigation panel is that there are other search features available.

In Settings, you can enable the add-on to auto-start any time the document is opened. You can also enable the Case sensitive search feature.

Using a Table Of Contents

Anychart: Turning Data Into Actionable Insights With Award

Founded in 2003,

Emerging Out of Challenges

The company’s story began more than 16 years ago. At that time, AnyChart’s founders saw a big opportunity in the growing adoption of Flash and XML. They understood it was possible to extract data from literally any source in the XML format and then visualize it as an interactive chart in Flash. Flash was everywhere, so AnyChart succeeded as a “one-size-fits-all” tool for interactive charting. At the time of AnyChart’s inception, Flash and XML were still young technologies. That resulted in a lot of bug reports as well as security and related issues in Flash, causing problems that did not depend on the team. When big companies like Oracle started joining the company’s customer list, the company began to deal with a really massive flow of queries and reports from thousands of developers from all over the world. To cope with that, AnyChart had to entirely rethink and rearrange its technical support and product development activities. That optimization was one of the key elements of its success, and its current level of customer support and work with customers in general is known to be especially high. Moving ahead, as Flash was falling down and HTML5 was growing as the modern web’s core standard, AnyChart reduced its dependency on Flash by adding the support of SVG and releasing its own JavaScript charting library as a brand new product, from scratch. Then the company completely shifted to HTML5 while still supporting its Flash components for the customers who keeps using that technology. Yet one of the biggest challenges in the life of AnyChart — that’s how the team remember that transition.  

Current Leader of Data Visualization Tools

Currently, the core product of AnyChart is a powerful feature-rich JavaScript charting library. It seamlessly works with all major programming languages, frameworks, libraries, and databases. Developers enjoy using it to create custom data visualizations, natively embedding those charts into various websites, corporate reporting, analytics and BI applications, mobile projects, OEMs, and SaaS products. AnyChart is proud to serve more than 70% of the Fortune 1000 members and more than half of the top 1000 software vendors worldwide. Thousands of businesses around the globe use AnyChart to power their data analytics and business intelligence, from startups to the biggest corporations including but far from limited to Microsoft, Samsung, Oracle, Volkswagen, Rolex, Bosch, McDonald’s, Lockheed Martin, Reuters, Citi, and many others. The company has customers from a wide range of industries: health care, media, retail, telecom, oil, software, and so on. Featured in numerous lists and directories as one of the best JavaScript charting libraries, AnyChart has also won multiple awards. For instance, the jury — comprising experts from Google, IBM, TIBCO, Mozilla, and other top technology companies — named AnyChart the best innovation in JavaScript Technology at last year’s DEVIES Awards within the framework of the world’s largest regular developer tech event, DeveloperWeek in California.  

Flexible Creative Solution

AnyChart is a highly customizable data visualization tool. Graphics are rendered using GraphicsJS — it is the company’s own innovative open-source JavaScript library for drawing SVG graphics (with VML fallback in older browsers), which allows developers to modify charts in endless ways. Although technically AnyChart is one big library, for customer and development convenience, it is marketed as a product family that consists of four JavaScript charting libraries, each optimized to serve a specific data visualization purpose: • AnyChart — for making basic JS charts of more than 70 chart types. • AnyGantt — for Gantt charts, both project and resource, and PERT charts. • AnyMap — for maps and seat charts. • AnyStock — for stock, financial, or any date/time charts. This year has been particularly exciting for the company. In spring of 2023, AnyChart announced a technology partnership with Qlik, adding three extensions for Qlik Sense with a fourth on the way soon. By integrating seamlessly into the Qlik environment and bringing more than 30 chart types (and counting), AnyChart has opened up multiple new charts to the Qlik community and engaged with an entirely new set of users in addition to the previously earned customer base.  

Valuable Testimonials

“AnyChart technology has allowed us to significantly improve Oracle Application Express’s charting capabilities.” — Michael Hichwa, Vice President of Software Development, Oracle. “AnyChart’s powerful logarithmic charting allowed us to display complex acoustical data in an easy to understand interface.” — Erik Gundersen, Director Advanced Products, Rockford Corp. “AnyChart generates all our charts in our Health and Wellbeing Profiles. To have so many options has been brilliant! The range of charts available and the amount of customization is impressive. Also, the ability to add error bars was essential for us.” — Mark Painter, Community Intelligence Team, UK’s Devon County Council.  

AnyChart Never Stops

Already at the top position in the segment of data visualization software for business intelligence and analytics, AnyChart is aimed at further strengthening the company’s global leadership.

How Does Alias Work In Postgresql?

Introduction to PostgreSQL Alias

In simple terms, ALIAS means temporarily giving another name to a table or a column. To give the temporary name for tables or columns, we generally use PostgreSQL Alias. The PostgreSQL Aliases are used to create a temporary column or table name. The existence of aliasing is limited to the PostgreSQL statement’s execution means the PostgreSQL aliases are used to rename a column or a table in a specific PostgreSQL query. Hence the actual table name or column name does not change in the database. We generally use the temporary names while performing self join on the table to create a temporary table.

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Syntax

We can use PostgreSQL Aliases to create a temporary name for columns, tables, or expressions. Let’s understand the syntax of Alias as below :

SELECT column [AS] alias_name FROM table;

2. PostgreSQL Aliases for expression

SELECT expression [AS] alias_name FROM table;

3. PostgreSQL Aliases for table

SELECT column FROM table [AS] alias_name;

Explanation:

Column: The actual column name to which we want to specify an alias.

table_name: The actual table name to which we want to specify an alias.

expression: An expression to which we want to specify an alias.

AS: It is the Optional keyword. AS keyword will not affect the Alias in the PostgreSQL statement, even if it is defined or not. In PostgreSQL, defining AS keyword or not is a programmer’s choice.

alias_name: The temporary name for expressions, columns, or tables. The PostgreSQL Alias name can have spaces. But it is not a best practice to have an alias name with spaces in case of aliasing a table.

How does Alias Work in PostgreSQL?

The PostgreSQL Aliases are used to remove the ambiguity for self-joins. The self join means the same table is getting scanned multiple times to retrieve the data. The PostgreSQL Alias is used with the optional ‘alias’ keyword, but if provided, it hides the actual name of the columns or tables. If we have specified the Alias in the PostgreSQL statement, we need to define the column names, and the Alias defined, and its scope is limited to the same statement only.

Example:

Consider a statement ‘FROM MyTable AS MT’, which we are using with a SELECT statement; then it uses the ‘MT’ and not the ‘MyTable’.

Consider the following statements to understand how PostgreSQL works for long table names:

SELECT long_table_name.column FROM long_table_name;

We can use the Alias for the long table name as follows:

SELECT ltn.column FROM long_table_name ltn;

Here we have specified the alias ‘ltn’ for a table ‘long_table_name’.

Examples to Implement Alias in PostgreSQL

Let’s create a table of name ‘student’ and ‘teacher’ to understand the PostgreSQL alias examples in detail:

Example #1

Create a table of name ‘student.’

Code:

CREATE TABLE student( rollno int PRIMARY KEY, firstname VARCHAR (50) NOT NULL, lastname VARCHAR (50) NOT NULL, branch VARCHAR (50) NOT NULL, result boolean, joining_date DATE NOT NULL );

Now, insert some data into thestudent’ table.

INSERT INTO student (rollno, firstname, lastname, branch, result, joining_date) values ('101', 'Oliver','Jake', 'Civil', false, '06-01-2024'), ('102', 'Jack','Connor', 'Computer', false, '06-01-2024'), ('103', 'Harry','Callum', 'Civil', false, '06-01-2024'), ('104', 'Jacob','John', 'Computer', false, '06-01-2024'), ('105', 'Thomas','David', 'Civil', false, '06-01-2024');

Now, illustrate the data inserted into the ‘student’ table with the following SQL statement’s help.

select * from student;

Example #2

Create a table of name ‘teacher.’

Code:

CREATE TABLE teacher ( teacher_id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, firstname VARCHAR (50) NOT NULL, lastname VARCHAR (50) NOT NULL, branch VARCHAR (50) NOT null, salary numeric ); INSERT INTO teacher (teacher_id, firstname, lastname, branch,salary) values ('1', 'Hugo','Smith', 'Computer',20000), ('2', 'Brayden','Johnson', 'Computer',30000), ('3', 'Ronan','Williams', 'Civil',35000), ('4', 'Antonio','Brown', 'Civil',40000), ('5', 'Marco','Davis', 'Civil',25000);

Now, illustrate the data inserted into the ‘teacher’ table with the following SQL statement’s help.

select * from teacher;

1. PostgreSQL Aliases for column

We specify the alias names to make the column headers more readable in the final result set. Like whenever we use functions like MAX, we can alias the result of the MAX function to make it easier to read.

SELECT firstname, MAX(salary) AS high_salary FROM teacher GROUP BY firstname;

Illustrate the result of the above statement using the following snapshot.

In the above example, we aliased MAX(salary) as ‘high_salary’. Therefore, the column header of the second column will be displayed as ‘high_salary’. In this example, we have not added any space in, so it does not need to add quotes around the given alias_name.

It is acceptable to add quotes around the alias_name in PostgreSQL Alias as follows:

SELECT firstname, MAX(salary) AS "high_salary" FROM teacher GROUP BY firstname;

Illustrate the result of the above statement using the following snapshot.

SELECT firstname, MAX(salary) AS "high salary" FROM teacher GROUP BY firstname;

Illustrate the result of the above statement using the following snapshot.

2. PostgreSQL Aliases for table

We generally use the Alias on the table if we want to abbreviate the name to the table to make the queries more readable and shorter, or in the case of SELF JOIN, where we use the same table multiple times. It is acceptable to define aliases for the tables you want to give a temporary name and not for all tables.

Let’s consider the following example to understand the table alias.

SELECT s.firstname, s.branch, teacher.firstname FROM student s INNER JOIN teacher ON s.branch = teacher.branch ORDER BY s.rollno asc;

Illustrate the result of the above statement using the following snapshot.

In the above statement for the ‘student’ table, we have created Alias s. So in this statement, we can use ‘s’ instead of the student table as it refers to the ‘student’ table.

Now we will add an alias for the ‘teacher’ table as ‘t’; look at the following example.

SELECT s.firstname, s.branch, t.firstname FROM student s INNER JOIN teacher t ON s.branch = t.branch ORDER BY s.rollno asc;

Illustrate the result of the above statement using the following snapshot.

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We hope that this EDUCBA information on “PostgreSQL Alias” was beneficial to you. You can view EDUCBA’s recommended articles for more information.

How To Insert A Check Mark (Tick ✓) Symbol In Excel

Watch video – Insert and Use Checkmark Symbol in Excel

Below is the written tutorial, in case you prefer reading over watching the video.

In Excel, there are two kinds of tick marks (✓) that you can insert – a check mark and a checkbox.

And no… these are not the same.

Let me explain.

While a check mark and a checkbox may look somewhat similar, these two are very different in the way it can be inserted and used in Excel.

A check mark is a symbol that you can insert in a cell (just like any text that you type). This means that when you copy the cell, you also copy the check mark and when you delete the cell, you also delete the check mark. Just like regular text, you can format it by changing the color and font size.

A checkbox, on the other hand, is an object that sits above the worksheet. So when you place a checkbox above a cell, it’s not a part of the cell but is an object that is over it. This means that if you delete the cell, the checkbox may not get deleted. Also, you can select a checkbox and drag it anywhere in the worksheet (as it’s not bound to the cell).

You will find checkboxes being used in interactive reports and dashboards, while a checkmark is a symbol that you may want to include as a part of the report.

A check mark is a symbol in the cell and a checkbox (which is literally in a box) is an object that is placed above the cells.

In this article, I will only be covering check marks. If you want to learn more about checkbox, here is a detailed tutorial.

There are quite a few ways that you can use to insert a check mark symbol in Excel.

In this article, I will show you all the methods I know.

The method you use would be dependent on how you want to use the check mark in your work (as you’ll see later in this tutorial).

Let’s get started!

Starting with the easiest one.

Since you’re already reading this article, you can copy the below check mark and paste it in Excel.

Simply paste the check mark (Control + V).

Once you have the check mark in Excel, you can copy it and paste it as many times as you want.

This method is suited when you want to copy paste the check mark in a few places. Since this involves doing it manually, it’s not meant for huge reports where you have to insert check marks for hundreds or thousands of cells based on criteria. In such a case, it’s better to use a formula (as shown later in this tutorial).

For using the keyboard shortcuts, you will have to change the font of the cells to Wingdings 2 (or Wingdings based on the keyboard shortcut you’re using).

Below are the shortcuts for inserting a check mark or a cross symbol in cells. To use the below shortcuts, you need to change the font to Wingdings 2.

Below are some more keyboard shortcuts that you can use to insert check mark and cross symbols. To use the below shortcuts, you need to change the font to Wingdings (without the 2).

This method is best suited when you only want a check mark in the cell. Since this method requires you to change the font to Wingdings or Wingdings 2, it will not be useful if you want to have any other text or numbers in the same cell with the check mark or the cross mark.

Another way to insert a check mark symbol (or any symbol for that matter) in Excel is using the Symbol dialog box.

Here are the steps to insert the check mark (tick mark) using the Symbol dialog box:

Select the cell in which you want the check mark symbol.

In the Symbol dialog box that opens, select ‘Segoe UI Symbol’ as the font.

The above steps would insert one check mark in the selected cell.

If you want more, simply copy the already inserted one and use it.

Note that using ‘Segoe UI Symbol’ allows you to use the check mark in any regularly used font in Excel (such as Arial, Time Now, Calibri, or Verdana). The shape and size may adjust a little based on the font. This also means that you can have text/number along with the check mark in the same cell.

This method is a bit longer but doesn’t require you to know any shortcut or CHAR code. Once you have used it to insert the symbol, you can reuse that one by copy pasting it.

You can use the CHAR function to return a check mark (or a cross mark).

The below formula would return a check mark symbol in the cell.

=CHAR(252)

For this to work, you need to convert the font to Wingdings

Why?

Because when you use the CHAR(252) formula, it would give you the ANSI character (ü), and then when you change the font to Wingdings, it is converted to a check mark.

You can use similar CHAR formulas (with different code number) to get another format of the check mark or the cross mark.

The real benefit of using a formula is when you use it with other formulas and return the check mark or the cross mark as the result.

For example, suppose you have a dataset as shown below:

You can use the below IF formula to get a check mark if the sale value is more than 5000 and a cross mark if it’s less than 5000.

Remember, you need to convert the column font to Wingdings.

This helps you make your reports a little more visual. It also works well with printed reports.

This method is suited when you want the check mark insertion to be dependent on cell values. Since this uses a formula, you can use it even when you have hundreds or thousands of cells. Also, since you need to change the font of the cells to Wingdings, you can’t have anything else in the cells except the symbols.

Excel has a feature where it can autocorrect misspelled words automatically.

For example, type the word ‘bcak’ in a cell in Excel and see what happens. It will automatically correct it to the word ‘back’.

This happens as there is already a pre-made list of expected misspelled words you’re likely to type and Excel automatically corrects it for you.

Here are the steps to use autocorrect to insert the delta symbol:

In the Options dialogue box, select Proofing.

In the Autocorrect dialogue box, enter the following:

Replace: CMARK

With: ✔ (you can copy and paste this)

Now whenever you type the words CMARK in a cell in Excel, it will automatically change it to a check mark.

Here are a few things you need to know when using the Autocorrect method:

This is case sensitive. So if you enter ‘cmark’, it will not get converted into the check mark symbol. You need to enter CMARK.

This change also gets applied to all the other Microsoft applications (MS Word, PowerPoint, etc.). So be cautious and choose the keyword that you are highly unlikely to use in any other application.

If there is any text/number before/after CMARK, it will not be converted to the check mark symbol. For example, ‘38%CMARK’ will not get converted, however, ‘38% CMARK’ will get converted to ‘38% ✔’

Related Tutorial: Excel Autocorrect

This method is suited when you want a ready reference for the check mark and you use it regularly in your work. So instead of remembering the shortcuts or using the symbols dialog box, you can quickly use the shortcode name that you have created for check mark (or any other symbol for that matter).

You can use conditional formatting to insert a check mark or a cross mark based on the cell value.

For example, suppose you have the data set as shown below and you want to insert a check mark if the value is more than 5000 and a cross mark if it’s less than 5000.

Here are the steps to do this using conditional formatting:

In cell B2, enter =A2, and then copy this formula for all cells. This will make sure that now you have the same value in the adjacent cell and if you change the value in column A, it’s automatically changed in column B.

Select all the cells in column B (in which you want to insert the check mark).

In the ‘Icon Style’ drop-down, select the style with the check mark and cross mark.

Check the ‘Show Icon only’ box. This will ensure that only the icons are visible and the numbers are hidden.

In the Icon settings. change the ‘percent’ to the ‘number’ and make the settings as shown below.

The above steps will insert a green check mark whenever the value is more than or equal to 5000 and a red cross mark whenever the value is less than 5000.

In this case, I have only used these two icons, but you can also use the yellow exclamation mark as well if you want.

Sub InsertCheckMark() Range("A1").Font.Name = "Wingdings" Range("A1").Value = "ü" End Sub

Below is the code to do this:

If Target.Column = 2 Then Cancel = True Target.Font.Name = “Wingdings” If Target.Value = “” Then Target.Value = “ü” Else Target.Value = “” End If End If End Sub

A check mark is just like any other text or symbol that you use.

This means that you can easily change its color and size.

All you need to do is select the cells that have the symbol and apply the formatting such as font size, font color, and bold etc.

This way of formatting symbols is manual and suited only when you have a couple of symbols to format. If you have a lot of these, it’s better to use conditional formatting to format these (as shown in the next section).

With conditional formatting, you can format the cells based on what type of symbol it has.

Below is an example:

Column B uses the CHAR function to return a check mark if the value is more than 5000 and a cross mark if the value is less than 5000.

The ones in column C and D uses conditional formatting and look way better as it improves visual representation using colors.

Let’s see how you can do this.

Below is a dataset where I have used the CHAR function to get the check mark or cross mark based on the cell value.

Below are the steps to color the cells based on the symbol it has:

Select the cells that have the check-mark/cross-mark symbols.

In the New Formatting Rule dialog box, select ‘Use a formula to determine which cells to format’

In the formula field, enter the following formula: =B2=CHAR(252)

In the ‘Format Cells’ dialog box, go to the Fill tab and select the green color.

Go to the Font tab and select color as white (this is to make sure your checkmark looks nice when the cell has a green background color).

After the above steps, the data is going to look as shown below. All the cells that have the check mark will be colored in green with white font.

You need to repeat the same steps to now format the cells with a cross mark. Change the formula to =B2=char(251) in step 6 and formatting in step 9.

If you want to count the total number of check marks (or cross marks), you can do that using a combination of COUNTIF and CHAR.

For example, suppose you have the data set as shown below and you want to find out the total number of stores that have achieved the sales target.

Below is the formula that will give you the total number of check marks in column C

=COUNTIF($C$2:$C$10,CHAR(252))

Note that this formula relies on you using the ANSI code 252 to get the check mark. This would work if you have used the keyboard shortcut ALT 0252, or have used the formula =Char(252) or have copied and pasted the check mark that is the created using these methods. If this is not the case, then the above COUNTIF function is not going to work.

You May Also like the following Excel tutorials:

How Insert Done In T

Introduction to T-SQL INSERT

T-SQL is a Transact SQL. It is an extension of the SQL language. Similar to SQL, we have data types, functions, indexes, and procedure concepts in the T-SQL. It is a Microsoft product. SQL stands for structured query language. SQL (structured query language) is common for all RDBMS.

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Structured query language (SQL) stands as an intermediate interaction to the databases. We use commands by which we get data from the database. It has INSERT, SELECT, DELETE, DROP, TRUNCATE, and many other commands related to the actions to be done with the data.

Syntax:

Let us consider the Insert command syntax in T-SQL; – As T-SQL insert is an extension of SQL language, the syntax is similar to SQL.

There are two ways we can determine they are stated below:

1.

INSERT INTO TABLE_NAME [(column_name1, column_name2, column_name3,...column_nameN)] VALUES (col1_value, col2_value, col3_value,...colN_value);

Above, we determine the column list as well. If we don’t specify the column and insert it takes the value to ‘NULL’

2.

INSERT INTO TABLE_NAME VALUES (col1_value, col2_value, col3_value,...colN_value);

Above syntax, all the column data should match, not an error will be thrown.

How Insert done in T-SQL?

Now let us consider the above two syntaxes and try to insert them into the table.

INSERT INTO TABLE_NAME [(column_name1, column_name2, column_name3,...column_nameN)] VALUES (col1_value, col2_value, col3_value,...colN_value);

Let us create a table and use the above syntax format and insert data into the table: –

create table Test_insert_command ( shop_id int, product_id int, brand_id int, Shop_name varchar(20), quantity int, price int );

Now let us insert data into the table:

insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id,Shop_name,quantity,price) values (1,1,1,'Kellogs',45,45); insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id,Shop_name,quantity,price) values (2,7,5,'Fantasy Store',75,145); insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id,Shop_name,quantity,price) values (3,3,2,'Laxshmi store',65,85); insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id,Shop_name,quantity,price) values (4,4,7,'General store',25,65); insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id,Shop_name,quantity,price) values (5,5,8,'Corn store',35,75); select * from Test_insert_command;

In the above insert statement’s we have given all the values and inserted them into the table. The result will be as below:

insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id,Shop_name) values (6,1,1,'Kels Store'); insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id,Shop_name) values (4,7,5,'Paradise Store'); insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id,Shop_name) values (6,3,2,'Luxury store'); insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id,Shop_name) values (1,4,7,'General store'); select * from test_insert_command;

Output:

As no data is inserted in the column quantity, price the values are inserted as NULL.

Now let us change the order and insert the data.

insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,brand_id,Shop_name,product_id) values (6,1,'Kels Store',9); insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id, quantity) values (4,7,5,340); insert into Test_insert_command(shop_id,product_id,brand_id, price) values (6,3,2,12); select * from test_insert_command;

Output:

Now let us insert in the below format:

Syntax:

INSERT INTO TABLE_NAME VALUES (col1_value, col2_value, col3_value,...colN_value); insert into test_insert_command values(3, 7, 5,'Posaman store', 67, 900); insert into test_insert_command values(9, 3, 7,'man store', 17, 670); insert into test_insert_command values(4, 10, 2,'saman store', 77, 560); select * from test_insert_command;

Output:

Example

Now let us see another example for the insert command:

create table test_insert ( stud_id int, stud_mark int, stud_subject varchar(10) );

1. Insert data into the table:

insert into test_insert(stud_id,stud_mark,stud_subject)values (1, 89,'English'); insert into test_insert(stud_id,stud_subject,stud_mark)values (6,'English', 78); insert into test_insert(stud_subject,stud_id,stud_mark)values ('English', 4, 89); insert into test_insert values (8, 69,'English'); insert into test_insert values (9, 49,'English'); insert into test_insert values (5, 79,'English');

Let us insert few more rows and perform Select statement for the above table:

insert into test_insert(stud_id,stud_subject)values (16,'English'); insert into test_insert(stud_subject,stud_id)values ('English', 67); select * from test_insert;

Output:

Conclusion

Similar to SQL, we have data types, functions, index, and procedure concepts in the T-SQL. It is a Microsoft product. SQL stands for structured query language. SQL (structured query language) is common for all RDBMS.

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