Trending February 2024 # Let’S Hope Samsung’S Galaxy Watch Is Better Than Its Old Watch # Suggested March 2024 # Top 2 Popular

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Let’s hope Samsung’s Galaxy Watch is better than its old watch-phone

All eyes may be on Samsung’s smartwatch plans, confirmed by the company’s mobile EVP today, but it’s not the first time the Korean firm has made a play – albeit underwhelming – for our wrists. Back in 2009 the company’s goal was to put an entire phone on your arm, in the shape of the S9110 watch phone. Faced with a 1.76-inch touchscreen – complete with a fake analog watchface, naturally – the Dick Tracy timepiece saw a limited, expensive launch and then swiftly sank from sight.

Mediocre specifications – even by the state of the 2009 marketplace – didn’t help. By trying to fit an entire phone into an 11.89mm thick watch, Samsung could only really accomodate the most basic of features: Bluetooth 2.1, 40MB of internal storage – enough for maybe ten MP3s for its onboard music player – and dualband GPRS data. You could scan your through email on the 176 x 220 display, thanks to Outlook sync, but the S9110 was really more of a terminal for calls and texts.

Of course, the S9110 looked like a powerhouse in comparison to Samsung’s first watch phone attempt, a full decade earlier with the SPH-WP10. That stood a towering two centimeters off your wrist, and offered such magic as voice dialing and a battery good for 90 minutes of talktime.

So what’s changed between 2009 and today? For a start, there’s been a backlash of sorts against convergence: the idea that a single device must satisfy our every need. Instead, the mobile industry has rediscovered specificity, with gadgets that do one or two things especially well, rather than making a hash at everything. We’ve seen that with Samsung’s own S Band, announced alongside the GALAXY S 4, following the fitness-tracking wearables trend to monitor your movements and squirt that data via Bluetooth to your phone or tablet.

There’s a more obvious reason for the failure of watch phones to take off, despite their classic sci-fi appeal. Mobile displays have been getting progressively larger as the years have gone on; a year after the S9110 was announced, Samsung launched the original Galaxy S. At the time, its 4-inch screen seemed vast; now, the GALAXY S 4 is up to 5-inches, and those who want more screen space can slake their thirst with the 5.5-inch Galaxy Note II. In contrast, a phone on your wrist needs to be small enough to be unobtrusive, something at odds with the pleasures of an expansive panel for your browsing, multimedia, messaging, and everything else your phone today can do.

We’re yet to see a fully convincing smartwatch. Pebble has perhaps come closest, but it’s still flawed – more around software than hardware, admittedly – and the Kickstarter-funded business model means general availability is still waiting on backer rewards being fulfilled. It’s not just a question of making the hardware sleek enough (though, when your natural watch-wearing audience is fond of their Rolex, Omega, IWC, or other brand-name timepiece, you really need to make sure your smartwatch can compete. People may stomach carrying two phones, but they probably won’t wear two watches) but delivering the right mixture of usability.

Too ambitious, and you lose the immediacy and at-a-glance convenience having a screen on your wrist delivers; you also start to encounter input and control issues. Too humble, and users may decide there’s not quite enough to warrant actually strapping your gadget on in the first place.

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New Robotic Hands Let Deep

A new remote-controlled robotic hand will allow deep-sea divers to handle and feel objects underwater almost as easily as they can in air. This could transform deep-water operations, from marine biology to pipeline repair.

Atmospheric Dive Suits (ADS) are required for dives below three hundred feet. The ADS is a human-shaped hard shell enclosing diver so they can breathe air at normal pressure. ADS have become more sophisticated in some ways over the last century, but they still have primitive lobster-like claws called prehensors rather than hands.

The tremendous pressure at great depths makes gloves impractical, but prehensors are clumsy and awkward. One operator compares them to using chopsticks. Considerable practice is needed to achieve any expertise, and even then, there is only one possible movement or ‘degree of freedom,’ opening or closing the claw. The lack of contact makes it hard to pick up irregularly-shaped objects, and prehensors cannot hold ordinary tools like drills and hammers. Everything is a lot of work, and some jobs are impossible.

Until now. Vishwa Robotics of Cambridge, Mass., has developed a human-like deep-sea robotic hand called the Vishwa Extensor for the US Navy. CEO Bhargav Gajjar says the Extensor so called because it extends human manipulation in extreme environments. Unlike prehensors, it is highly intuitive to use, operated by a glove-like controller with force-feedback so the user can grip as firmly as needed.

“Hydrostatic pressure is the devil of it all.”

Gajjar points out that the Extensor is not an Iron Man-type exoskeleton, because it is remote from the operator’s hand; nor is it a prosthetic, though it has something in common with both. It is a dextrous, remotely operated robotic hand. The Extensor resembles a human hand on the outside, although inside is a complex arrangement of actuators and robotic mechanisms adapted to the pressures of the deep.

“Hydrostatic pressure is the devil of it all. It crumples every single surface,” says Gajjar. “How to get around it and still have a working human-shaped grasper is one of the main challenges.”

The Extensor currently has two fingers and a thumb. Gajjar the last three fingers on humans hands tend to move together, and extra fingers do little to improve performance. The fingers themselves are far more flexible than prehensors, each finger and thumb having four degrees of freedom, aided by three degrees in the wrist, providing the dexterity to grasp and operate hand tools.

The operator can a use a wrench or pick up a nut and attach it to a bolt, fiendishly difficult with prehensors. Challenging tasks, such as working the hatch on a submarine during an underwater rescue, become straightforward. The Extensor can even work the trigger on a drill or other powered device, impossible with a prehensor due to its lack of multiple fingers and opposing thumb.

As well as fitting them to diving suits, the Navy plans to attach giant pairs of robotic arms and Vishwa Extensors to unmanned submarines to reach even greater depths. The operator stays on board ship, touching and manipulating objects deep underwater via a video and haptic (touch) link. This will aid Navy missions such as mine clearance, crash retrievals and salvage.

Underwater vehicles with human-like fingers

The Vishwa Extensor will get its first underwater tests in a test tank at Vishwa Robotics over the next few months, preparatory to deep water testing. Latest tests are planned in the deep ocean simulation chambers of the Navy’s Experimental Diving Unit.

The technology will be benefit commercial divers involved in construction, inspection and salvage. Adding Vishwa Extensors to existing ADS will make routine jobs like underwater welding or operating chipping hammers quicker and safer. In marine archaeology and biology, the delicate handling of the Vishwa Extensor is a big step forward. At the moment it is impossible to pick up fragile sea creatures from the ocean floor.

Gajjar says that the underlying technology could prove equally valuable out of the water. Any detailed work on the ISS requires astronauts to undertake laborious and potentially risky EVA (Extra Vehicular Activity); a remote-controlled spacesuit could be ready quicker and work longer. Disaster disputations involving radiation or chemical spills could also benefit from the effective remote handling. But the hands will debut underwater.

“The problem of teleoperation in the Last Frontier is finally solved,” says Gajjar. “Swimming human avatars, underwater vehicles with human-like fingers and the tactility of the human hands, will finally reach the extreme depths of our planet and make amazing discoveries.”

Vishwa Extensor

Vishwa Robotics CEO Bhargav Gajjar with the Vishwa Extensor

Has Obama Let Us Down?

Has Obama Let Us Down? Experts, students meet in town hall discussion tonight

A recent poll has shown Barack Obama’s once-huge popularity with young voters has eroded. Photo by Christopher Dilts for Organizing for America

In 2008 young voters hungry for change helped to make Barack Obama the country’s first black president. Three years later, the euphoria of that historic accomplishment has dramatically waned. A recent study by the Pew Research Center found that just 48 percent of voters aged 18 to 29 say Obama makes them feel hopeful, a steep slide from the 80 percent in November 2008. Only 49 percent approve of how he is doing his job, down from 73 percent in 2009.

How that happened and what it means will be the focus of tonight’s town-hall meeting Hope and Change? A Conversation on the Obama Presidency, being held at the George Sherman Union Conference Auditorium. Presented by BU Today, the meeting brings together political experts Thomas Fiedler (COM’71), dean of the College of Communication, and Robert Zelnick, a COM professor and former longtime ABC News correspondent, who will be joined by Anthony Priestas (GRS’12), a doctoral student in the College of Arts & Sciences earth sciences department and president of the student Libertarian group Liberty at Boston University, and Tabitha Watson (COM’12, CAS’12), an undergraduate studying journalism and political science. Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore (SED’87) will moderate the discussion.

“For many students, Obama’s candidacy turned them on to politics and the election process for the first time,” says Elmore. “Now that we’re a few years in and he’s running for reelection, it’s time for students to process what his first term has been like, and what the successes and failures have been.”

Priestas can easily list what he considers Obama’s failures, from expanding the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to reneging on his promise to close the Guantanamo Bay detention center. And his economic policies have yet to boost the economy or curb unemployment, which for ages 18 to 29 remains at 13 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

“Students strapped with debt are entering the workforce and realizing there is less opportunity for them,” Priestas says. “Instead of change, they got more of the same.”

Fiedler, a former executive editor of the Miami Herald, adds a broader reason for young people’s disappointment: an all but inevitable disenchantment with partisan politics. For many young voters, casting their ballot for Obama was the first time they engaged with the political system, and they’ve had to learn that an election is far more inspiring than the nitty-gritty of governing, especially with a deeply entrenched opposition.

“I think the disillusionment is more about recognizing that making change is hard,” says Fiedler. “It’s dirty work.”

Zelnick believes that young voters will reengage with the president when they consider the alternative. The aforementioned Pew study found that 53 percent of young voters viewed Republicans unfavorably and 36 percent viewed Democrats unfavorably.

Zelnick says he’s seen this before: in 1968, the radical, and mostly young, left-wing abandoned Democratic candidate Hubert Humphrey in the primary only to come flocking back in the general election against Richard Nixon.

BU Today presents Hope and Change? A Conversation on the Obama Presidency tonight, Tuesday, November 29, at 7 p.m. at the George Sherman Union Conference Auditorium, 775 Commonwealth Ave. Free, but registration is required; register here.

Paypal Alternatives That Let You Shop Around

Ever gone out to a fancy restaurant with friends, only to find that someone lacked the cash to pay their share? Is writing a paper check to a relative (say, a kid in college) a hassle?

Person-to-Person Payments

Popmoney, which debuted late last year, and ZashPay, which arrived this summer, work much like PayPal: For payments, you need only the recipient’s e-mail address or mobile phone number. One important difference: PayPal lets you send and receive payments only via your account with PayPal. To make a payment, you must first fund your account (through a linked bank account or credit card); to receive a payment, you must transfer it to the bank or credit card in order to use it for anything other than a PayPal purchase.

Popmoney and ZashPay simply transfer money directly from your bank account to the account of the person you’re paying (neither service supports credit cards). This process resembles the one used in electronic bill payments–and in fact, both services are offshoots of companies (Cash Edge in the case of Popmoney, and Fiserv in the case of ZashPay) that manage bill payment services for banks.

Both sender and recipient must have accounts on these services, but the services don’t tie up any money–they just associate your existing bank account with your e-mail address or your cell phone number.

If your bank offers either service, it will set up your account automatically–no need to provide additional info. Cash Edge says that some 175 banks already offer Popmoney; Fiserv says that ZashPay had about 70 banks on board as of early October.

Otherwise, you can still use these services to receive cash by signing up for a personal account on a service’s Website–but you must provide sensitive information, including your date of birth, Social Security number, and the accounting and routing numbers for the linked bank account. You must then go through a verification process, which involves waiting for the service to deposit two small (under $1) sums to your account and then reporting the exact amounts received.

Popmoney

Pros: Account setup on PopMoney site is free, as is receiving money. Some 175 banks offer free accounts to customers.

ZashPay

Since our bank doesn’t offer ZashPay, we set up an account for the service online, which took a few days–including waiting for the small verification deposits to appear in the bank account. All we had to do to make a payment was provide the recipient’s e-mail address and the amount we wished to send. When we received a payment, the service notified us via e-mail (you’ll get a text message if you set up your mobile phone). Turnaround time was one to two days.

Cons: Creating an account involves a verification process that requires you to supply lots of personal information. ZashPay doesn’t yet have as many banks on board as PopMoney–about 70 as of early October.

Other Upstarts

Other personal payment services are AlertPay and Obopay, which work on the same basic model as PayPal: You must set up and fund an account that makes and receives payments. Obopay offers strong support for mobile devices. AlertPay serves some people that PayPal does not, accepting additional funding sources such as money orders, and letting you send money to more than 190 countries.

Will people quit writing checks (or carrying lots of cash) and use these services instead? In order for that to happen, says Jim Bruene, who tracks online finance in his NetBanker blog, making payments has to become “as easy as pulling out a $20 bill.”

Next page: Business-focused services, and which to choose

Friends Don’t Let Friends Buy Cheap Android Phones

Android is quirky–the operating system has seen its fair share of ups and downs, but fans have stuck by it through thick and thin. We’ve survived malware scares, buggy phones, and some severe device fragmentation. However, all of that pales in comparison to the real danger to Android: cheap Android phones.

Cheaply made Android phones are the worst thing to happen to the mobile OS since the discovery of malware in the Google Play store. Not only are these “budget-friendly phones” frustrating to use, but their outdated specs and lack of manufacturer and carrier support mean you’ll end up with a dud no matter which one you choose.

Old Hardware

Phones such as the Samsung Galaxy Y, the Kyocera Milano, and the LG Optimus T ruin Android by providing consumers a subpar experience compared with that of premium phones like Samsung’s Galaxy S II line or the Motorola Droid Razr Maxx. It takes a lot of corner-cutting to sell a smartphone for $50 or less: Most of these budget phones have outdated processors, low-resolution screens, and too little storage space to hold apps and other data. Some of these phones ship with Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) or newer–but what’s the point when the hardware inside the phone can barely power the OS, let alone third-party apps? The processor may have enough juice for you to text and make phone calls, but it probably can’t run even simple games like Angry Birds or Draw Something.

No Support

Another drawback to buying budget smartphones is the lack of support from manufacturers. Compared with higher-end Android phones, budget phones are less likely to receive vital updates that fix bugs or other issues. As a result, you’ll probably be stuck with a merely semifunctional phone for a year or two until you can buy a new one.

Budget phones are also the least likely to see an upgrade to the newest version of Android. This issue may not a big deal for some people, but the difference in performance between Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) and Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich), for instance, is significant. A post by James Pikover at VentureBeat shows that phones can enjoy up to a 66 percent boost in performance and gain an extra hour in battery life just by being updated to Ice Cream Sandwich. The LG Optimus T shipped with Android 2.2 and was supposed to receive an upgrade to Android 2.3 a few months after its release. That was almost a year ago, and the phone is still being sold with Android 2.2. In LG’s budget Optimus line, only the Optimus S got an update to Gingerbread–and that didn’t happen until 11 months after its debut.

You Get What You Pay For

I really hate using this phrase, but when it comes to Android phones, you really do get what you pay for. As the Temple Run kerfuffle shows, budget phones make Android look bad to consumers–and developers. Apps will never work as well on cheap Android phones as they will on nonbudget smartphones, and the people who own cheap phones end up thinking that all Android phones must be problematic. Developers won’t want to develop apps for Android due to the amount of extra work and resources needed to support all of these different types of devices.

In order to preserve Android’s good name, I call upon you, my fellow Android users, not to buy these budget phones. If the only smartphone you can afford falls in the budget category, you’re honestly better off buying an ordinary feature phone or holding off until you can afford a premium Android phone. The premium phone will be worth the wait–and should you choose a feature phone in the meantime, at least it will give you a better experience than a budget Android phone will.

Is Your Child Depressed? Let Artificial Intelligence Find It Out

Around one in five children suffer from anxiety and depression, collectively known as internalising disorders. A crucial part of an internalising disorder treatment is early diagnosis because children respond very well at the development stage of their brains. Late treatment exposes the children to the risk of substance abuse and greater chances of committing suicide later in life. However, since children under the age of eight cannot reliably articulate their emotional suffering, adults need to be able to infer their mental state and recognise potential mental health problems. There is a long line for vital treatments, as the waiting list for appointments with psychologists, dubbed with a failure to recognise the symptoms by parents and guardians all add to the growing menace. Behavioural characteristics of patients with internalizing disorders include loneliness, anxiety, withdrawal, and depression. Any standard diagnosis continues for 90 minutes involving a semi-structured interview with the child’s primary guardian.  

Detecting Early Signs

The next question is how to detect the early signs of depression among small kids? The answer is technology. To know the early signs of depression among kids, scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) which is capable to detect early signs of anxiety and depression that arises from the speech patterns among small children. According to the research published in the Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics, the tool potentially provides a fast and easy way of diagnosing conditions that are difficult to spot and often overlooked in young people. The Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics suggests a machine learning algorithm could help speed up the diagnosis and treatment for kids with signs of depression. Using a modified version of the Trier-Social Stress Task, an assessment tool that induces stress and anxiety in the test taker, the researchers recorded the audio of 71 children between the ages of three and eight who were tasked with creating a three-minute story that would be judged on interest. A buzzer would sound after 90 seconds and again when there were 30 seconds remaining. The children were also evaluated using standard methods—a clinical interview and parent questionnaire. The audio recordings were fed into an AI machine learning algorithm to analyse the statistical features. The team discovered that three audio features, in particular, were highly indicative of identifying internalization disorders low-pitched voices, higher-pitched buzzer responses, and repeatable speech inflexions and content. The algorithm, which identifies the speech pattern, was able to distinguish between eight audio features out of which three stood out identifying the internalising disorder. These early signs include a low pitch voice, high pitch response to a surprising buzzer and stammering in speech which indicates the prevalence of depression. The algorithm took just a few seconds to analyse in contrast to parent-questionnaires and structured clinical interviews which generally take hours. In the test, the brief form inquires patients about their level of interest in the daily activities, including appetite and eating, their ability to focus and concentrate, one of the parameters designed to detect depression. This algorithm identified children with a diagnosis of an internalising disorder with an accuracy of 80%. The accurate diagnosis is a boom to

Early Diagnosis and Results

In addition to deploying algorithms, the children were also diagnosed with a structured parent questionnaire and clinical interview. These are both well-established ways of identifying internalising disorders in children.  

Looking Forward

The findings of the research would be very helpful to the medic-care industry as the speech analysis algorithm can be deployed into a universal screening tool for clinical use, easily reachable to the users through a smartphone app to record and analyse results immediately.

Around one in five children suffer from anxiety and depression, collectively known as internalising disorders. A crucial part of an internalising disorder treatment is early diagnosis because children respond very well at the development stage of their brains. Late treatment exposes the children to the risk of substance abuse and greater chances of committing suicide later in life. However, since children under the age of eight cannot reliably articulate their emotional suffering, adults need to be able to infer their mental state and recognise potential mental health problems. There is a long line for vital treatments, as the waiting list for appointments with psychologists, dubbed with a failure to recognise the symptoms by parents and guardians all add to the growing menace. Behavioural characteristics of patients with internalizing disorders include loneliness, anxiety, withdrawal, and depression. Any standard diagnosis continues for 90 minutes involving a semi-structured interview with the child’s primary chúng tôi next question is how to detect the early signs of depression among small kids? The answer is technology. To know the early signs of depression among kids, scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) which is capable to detect early signs of anxiety and depression that arises from the speech patterns among small children. According to the research published in the Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics, the tool potentially provides a fast and easy way of diagnosing conditions that are difficult to spot and often overlooked in young people. The Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics suggests a machine learning algorithm could help speed up the diagnosis and treatment for kids with signs of depression. Using a modified version of the Trier-Social Stress Task, an assessment tool that induces stress and anxiety in the test taker, the researchers recorded the audio of 71 children between the ages of three and eight who were tasked with creating a three-minute story that would be judged on interest. A buzzer would sound after 90 seconds and again when there were 30 seconds remaining. The children were also evaluated using standard methods—a clinical interview and parent questionnaire. The audio recordings were fed into an AI machine learning algorithm to analyse the statistical features. The team discovered that three audio features, in particular, were highly indicative of identifying internalization disorders low-pitched voices, higher-pitched buzzer responses, and repeatable speech inflexions and content. The algorithm, which identifies the speech pattern, was able to distinguish between eight audio features out of which three stood out identifying the internalising disorder. These early signs include a low pitch voice, high pitch response to a surprising buzzer and stammering in speech which indicates the prevalence of depression. The algorithm took just a few seconds to analyse in contrast to parent-questionnaires and structured clinical interviews which generally take hours. In the test, the brief form inquires patients about their level of interest in the daily activities, including appetite and eating, their ability to focus and concentrate, one of the parameters designed to detect depression. This algorithm identified children with a diagnosis of an internalising disorder with an accuracy of 80%. The accurate diagnosis is a boom to healthcare providers as it can give the results much more quickly in a few seconds of processing time once the task is chúng tôi addition to deploying algorithms, the children were also diagnosed with a structured parent questionnaire and clinical interview. These are both well-established ways of identifying internalising disorders in chúng tôi findings of the research would be very helpful to the medic-care industry as the speech analysis algorithm can be deployed into a universal screening tool for clinical use, easily reachable to the users through a smartphone app to record and analyse results immediately. In the future, the voice analysis could be combined with motion analysis to turn them to a battery of assisted tools. The findings could prove to be a boom for the well-being and early diagnosis of children who are at the risk of anxiety and depression before even their parents suspect that anything is wrong.

How The Nyan Cat Creator Let Memers Finally Get Paid

But they can also just be good, silly fun.

For the longest time, memes were a great cultural metric of creator disenfranchisement on the internet. The disparity between the heights of global popularity that viral sensations have reached and the lack of compensation (or even basic recognition) their creators received is vast. It’s enough to cause a massive case of cultural and ethical vertigo.

But this isn’t a colossal surprise. On the internet, it’s easy to forget that content doesn’t simply manifest out of the digital ether — it comes from real people. This perceived anonymity makes us more inclined to feel we possess it in some way, and more likely to share and use the content we stumble across as we see fit.

This cognitive disparity between origin and value is why internet memes make fitting candidates for the application of NFTs. Blockchain technology has undisputedly changed the game for cultural creators in the last few years. In fact, NFTs have helped meme creators gain the recognition and monetary compensation they deserve for changing the global internet landscape with their work. And we love to see it. 

But few people embody this iconic use-case more than Chris Torres, the 36-year-old, Dallas-based digital artist behind Nyan Cat, which is arguably one of the most famous internet memes of all time.

Nyan Cat origins

“It was overwhelming at first,” Torres said of the reaction he woke up to the following day, in an interview with nft now. “Waking up to 100 emails from people asking me what was going on. I’d never experienced anything like that before. It was the internet’s infancy of meme creation.”

Within days, Nyan Cat was everywhere. A music video set to the tune of a song by the artist daniwell shot across the internet, instantly ingraining itself in the memory of early-2010s web denizens.

It didn’t take long before individuals and even big businesses started using Nyan Cat for their own gain. Game developer isTom Games came out with a release called Nyan Cat: Lost In Space shortly after the meme’s birth. Even Warner Brothers used the meme without permission in a slew of games released on the Nintendo DS.

“Several companies have used my artwork [without permission],” Torres explained. “And it’s funny, all this time, Nyan Cat has kind of been free on the internet, everybody has been able to use it. But, as an artist, before NFTs, I never saw a dime for that. It was other people using it while I was on unemployment. In come NFTs, and now I finally have a way to get proper compensation for my artwork. It’s been a crazy ride.”

Torres first jumped on the crypto bandwagon by buying some Dogecoin in 2023, followed shortly by Ethereum and then Bitcoin. Then, a close friend introduced him to NFTs by showing him an article on various NFT marketplaces like SuperRare and Foundation.

Without quite understanding how NFTs worked and thinking the technology was too good to be true, Torres remastered the original GIF pixel by pixel and put the Nyan Cat NFT up for auction on Foundation on February 11, 2023.

“I thought I’d give it a try,” Torres said. “I was expecting maybe five or ten Ethereum at the time, but as the auction went on, I had a lot of people tell me that Nyan Cat was kind of an unofficial mascot of Ethereum, and I didn’t really know that. That final hour was just a giant bid war, and it landed at exactly 300 ETH.”

At the time, 300 ETH was worth nearly $600,000.

Building the meme economy

Torres says the sale changed both his life and memes forever, opening a door for creators like himself to join the Web3 community.

“With the NFT boom, I have finally been able to get proper credit for being an artist,” said Torres.  “And it’s really started the meme revolution. I called it the meme economy back then, and I still believe in it. Nyan Cat has been an awesome beacon in a way. Its success brought so many people into the space, including other meme people from my time, lots of OG meme creators.”

Torres explains how, immediately after the sale of Nyan Cat NFT, other meme creators began contacting him, curious about the process of getting set up to sell their memes as NFTs.

“It’s so surreal being able to help so many people in this way,” he said. “But that’s the power of Web3 and NFTs, being able to help other people and show that this person actually created this piece. I haven’t turned back ever since. Ever since I’ve joined NFTs, it feels like the best community to be in.”

Torres has helped some of the creators of the most well-known memes of all time onboard to Web3: Grumpy Cat, Keyboard Cat, Troll Face, Disaster Girl, and others. In April 2023, he helped bring The Coffin Dance NFT to Foundation, whose auction landed at 327 ETH, more than $1,000,000 at the time. Twenty-five percent of the proceeds from that sale went to benefit the Ukrainian charity Come Back Alive, which supports Ukrainian Armed Forces as they resist the Russian invasion.

“It’s just so great knowing that your creations are helping not just meme creators but people all over the world,” Torres said of the philanthropic potential of NFTs.

Nyan Dogg and the future of NFT memes

Torres has been busy since the sale of Nyan Cat, exploring the opportunities Web3 offers.

In April 2023, he collaborated with BeetsDAO and Snoop Dogg to drop the Nyan Dogg collection on OpenSea, featuring 131 editions of a 4/20 friendly Hazy Nyan Cat and 81 editions of a rainbow-emitting Nyan Blunt. 

“The collaboration with Nyan Dogg was kind of the [quintessential] Web3 experience,” recalled Torres. “I was contacted by BeetsDAO, saying they’d love to do a collaboration with me, and that they had an awesome guest that would like to do something with you. It was almost 4/20 at the time. I was already kind of making a hazy Nyan Cat, and they said, well, we have the perfect match for you, so here’s Snoop Dogg. It was a surreal experience and it also boosted my presence in the space. People already knew about the [Nyan Cat] sale, but now I was doing collaborations with major artists. We’re still in contact. It’s been pretty awesome.”

Looking toward the future, Torres is working on creating a collection of fractionalized NFTs for Nyan Cat as he wants the meme to be more accessible. He’s also brainstorming ways to link utilities to the NFTs he creates, launching collaborations with metaverses like Worldwide Webb, chúng tôi and Decentraland.

Torres also started the NFT collection G.I. Toadz just a few months ago, a project that CrypToadz’s creator Gremplin helped move forward by providing the project developers a folder of deleted NFTs that didn’t quite make the official collection. Torres and the G.I. Toadz team, which includes Loaf, TheOG, Klee, and Woody, then built on top of those models to create the new superhero-inspired Toadz drop. Torres and the team also donated the CrypToadz NFT Treasury over 42 ETH to help further their initiatives and 82 ETH to Endaoment, an organization that makes it easy to donate cryptocurrencies to charities.

Looking to experiment further in the Web3 space, Torres is also planning on releasing a photography NFT collection.

“Just a small, limited collection,” Torres said. “I post a lot of pictures of my cats all the time, so I want to have some fun with it. Right now I’m in the brainstorming process. I’m just trying to expand to other genres of NFTs.”

For Torres and others, NFTs have opened up a new vector of exploration and creative opportunities. While it was indeed a long time coming, the story of how meme creators and NFTs have found a home in one another is one of the best examples of why the era of Web3 is not only important for intellectual property rights, but also inevitable.

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