Trending February 2024 # I Hate Android: Why? – By A Hardcore Android Lover! # Suggested March 2024 # Top 9 Popular

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Like millions of people around the world, I am an Android fanboy. Recently I though about sharing some of my  aspects which I don’t like about Android.  Eventhough being Android has gotten better over the years but there are still many things I dont like about it. To put it bluntly, I hate Android, at least some of its features. I have used Linux for a few years since Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon and fell in love with the open source movement. Ive come to realize that all the hype about being open and portraying Apple and RIM as the evil closed platform was all a deception. . Theres a list(I love lists). Lets go through them. I hate some of the UI. Customization is nice but it allows for more things to break. These include themes and design. At first, the UI was cool and beautiful. I felt like I had a computer in my hands, literally. Icons were nice to touch and scrolling was smooth(at first). After using it for a while, I started to experience the pains of using the touch screen. Mistypes, and mistaps were frequent. The Android experience varied depending on manufacturer. All the different flavors of Android pushed by their respective hardware developers all look different. OneUI, TouchWiz, and MotoBlur are all different. OneUI is probably the best(IMO) out of all these. TouchWiz makes me feel like Im using an iPhone and MotoBlur is a mess with all their social networking widgets. These skins load on top of Android making it slower than its vanilla stock core. When I get my phone, I hate all the bloatware that comes with it. All carriers seem to do it. They push Vcast, SprintTV and other bloatware that I dont want. The Chinese manufacturers Xiaomi,Oppo,Vivo are the notorious ones feeding bloatware just to compnsate for the cheap price they offer in some countries. Not only that, but I hate that I cant delete them. I hate knowing that they are on my phone and the only way for me to get rid of them is by rooting my phone. Why do I have to jump through hoops just to get rid of this crapware? Im not scared of rooting my phone. In fact, Ive done so and install a few custom ROMs but there is always a risk of bricking your phone and leaving it useless. Average users dont want to risk the warranty by rooting their phone. Not only are there crapware on the phone, but there is/was malware on the Market. I hate Andoid memory management, being an old Symbian OS user.Symbian was the most efficient Mobile Os in memory management, followed by iOS. My old Nokia 808 Pureview had just 512MB RAM which was handling the Mammoth Camera, the 41MP beast with Xenon flash. I know that comparing a Symbian Phone with very limited apps and strict developer requirements with Android which has an ocean of apps and simpler developer standards is not fair. But are these crazy RAM of 12GB,16GB etc etc in many high end Android Phones really necessary? Or are they worth the performance they offer compared to iOs? Expanding from the 1st and the 3rd reasons, I hate Androids software fragmentation. I hate that Motorola’s flavor is different from Samsung’s. I hate that the buttons are different in all manufacturer, and even sometimes, within the same manufacturers. And I hate that I cant install certain apps because I my phone doesnt have the latest and greatest version of Android. Notoriously all my Samsung Phones from Galaxy S3 to Galaxy S9 Plus started showing sluggishness after 1 year of usage. The problem being whenever I update an app, the hardware is not able to cope with newest software. Android isВ recognized as the open platform and that unadulterated Android experience does not come standard. It only comes standard on Googles Nexus phones  and Selected flagship phones from other manufacturers. But most people dont own these flagship devices. Most people get their Droids from their carriers. Not only are these phones locked down with carrier bloatware but they are also locked down from performing specific tasks. People have gotten around this issue by a process called rooting. This grants the user superuser status allowing him to do anything he wishes with the phone. The Nexus phones are relatively easy to root but carrier phones are harder. Android phones are great if you want the phone to be your hobby, if you dont mind tinkering with the device, rooting it, or if youre just a techno buff.  

You're reading I Hate Android: Why? – By A Hardcore Android Lover!

How Can I Intercept The Status Bar Notifications In Android?

This example demonstrate about How can I intercept the Status Bar Notifications in Android

Step 1 − Create a new project in Android Studio, go to File ⇒ New Project and fill all required details to create a new project.

Step 2 − Add the following code to src/MyListener.java

public interface MyListener {    void setValue (String packageName) ; import android.content.Context ; import android.service.notification.NotificationListenerService ; import android.service.notification.StatusBarNotification ; import chúng tôi ; public class NotificationService extends NotificationListenerService {    private String TAG = this .getClass().getSimpleName() ;    Context context ;    static MyListener myListener ;    @Override    public void onCreate () {       super .onCreate() ;       context = getApplicationContext() ;    }    @Override    public void onNotificationPosted (StatusBarNotification sbn) {       Log. i ( TAG , "********** onNotificationPosted" ) ;       Log. i ( TAG , "ID :" + sbn.getId() + " t " + sbn.getNotification(). tickerText + " t " + sbn.getPackageName()) ;       myListener .setValue( "Post: " + sbn.getPackageName()) ;    }    @Override    public void onNotificationRemoved (StatusBarNotification sbn) {       Log. i ( TAG , "********** onNotificationRemoved" ) ;       Log. i ( TAG , "ID :" + sbn.getId() + " t " + sbn.getNotification(). tickerText + " t " + sbn.getPackageName()) ;       myListener .setValue( "Remove: " + sbn.getPackageName()) ;    }    public void setListener (MyListener myListener) {       NotificationService. myListener = myListener ;    }    <item       android :id = "@+id/action_settings"       android :orderInCategory = "100"       android :title = "Settings"    android :layout_width = "match_parent"    android :layout_height = "match_parent"    android :padding = "16dp"    <Button       android :id = "@+id/btnCreateNotification"       android :layout_width = "wrap_content"       android :layout_height = "wrap_content"       android :layout_alignParentStart = "true"       android :layout_alignParentTop = "true"       android :layout_alignParentEnd = "true"    <ScrollView       android :layout_width = "match_parent"       android :layout_height = "match_parent"       android :layout_below = "@+id/btnCreateNotification"       android :layout_alignStart = "@+id/btnCreateNotification"       android :layout_alignEnd = "@+id/btnCreateNotification"       <TextView          android :id = "@+id/textView"          android :layout_width = "match_parent"          android :layout_height = "wrap_content"          android :text = "NotificationListenerService Example" import android.app.NotificationChannel ; import android.app.NotificationManager ; import android.content.Intent ; import android.os.Bundle ; import android.support.v4.app.NotificationCompat ; import android.support.v7.app.AppCompatActivity ; import chúng tôi ; import android.view.MenuItem ; import chúng tôi ; import android.widget.Button ; import android.widget.TextView ; public class MainActivity extends AppCompatActivity implements MyListener {    private TextView txtView ;    public static final String NOTIFICATION_CHANNEL_ID = "10001" ;    private final static String default_notification_channel_id = "default" ;    @Override    protected void onCreate (Bundle savedInstanceState) {       super .onCreate(savedInstanceState) ;       setContentView(R.layout. activity_main ) ;       new NotificationService().setListener( this ) ;       txtView = findViewById(R.id. textView ) ;       Button btnCreateNotification = findViewById(R.id. btnCreateNotification ) ;          @Override             NotificationManager mNotificationManager = (NotificationManager)             getSystemService( NOTIFICATION_SERVICE ) ;             NotificationCompat.Builder mBuilder = new NotificationCompat.Builder(MainActivity. this, default_notification_channel_id ) ;             mBuilder.setContentTitle( "My Notification" ) ;             mBuilder.setContentText( "Notification Listener Service Example" ) ;             mBuilder.setTicker( "Notification Listener Service Example" ) ;             mBuilder.setSmallIcon(R.drawable. ic_launcher_foreground ) ;             mBuilder.setAutoCancel( true ) ;                int importance = NotificationManager. IMPORTANCE_HIGH ;                NotificationChannel notificationChannel = new NotificationChannel( NOTIFICATION_CHANNEL_ID , "NOTIFICATION_CHANNEL_NAME" , importance) ;                mBuilder.setChannelId( NOTIFICATION_CHANNEL_ID ) ;                assert mNotificationManager != null;                mNotificationManager.createNotificationChannel(notificationChannel) ;             }             assert mNotificationManager != null;             mNotificationManager.notify(( int ) System. currentTimeMillis () , mBuilder.build()) ;          }       }) ;    }    @Override    public boolean onCreateOptionsMenu (Menu menu) {       getMenuInflater().inflate(R.menu. menu_main , menu) ;       return true;    }    @Override    public boolean onOptionsItemSelected (MenuItem item) {       switch (item.getItemId()) {          case chúng tôi action_settings :             Intent intent = new Intent("android.settings.ACTION_NOTIFICATION_LISTENER_SETTINGS" ) ;             startActivity(intent) ;             return true;          default :             return super .onOptionsItemSelected(item) ;       }    }    @Override    public void setValue (String packageName) {    }    <application       android :allowBackup = "true"       android :icon = "@mipmap/ic_launcher"       android :label = "@string/app_name"       android :roundIcon = "@mipmap/ic_launcher_round"       android :supportsRtl = "true"       <service          android :name = ".NotificationService"          android :label = "@string/app_name"

Let’S Build A Custom Keyboard For Android

Code

android:id="@+id/keyboard_view" android:keyPreviewLayout="@Layout/key_preview" android:layout_alignParentBottom="true"     android:layout_width="match_parent" android:layout_height="match_parent"     android:background="@color/colorPrimaryDark"     android:textColor="@color/colorPrimary"     android:textAlignment="center"     Designing your keyboard

We’ve built a bunch of XML files and now we’re ready to start having some fun. It’s time to create the layout of the keys!

This is what I used. It’s basically a slightly tweaked version of a keyboard layout I found online, with the keys all in standard rows. It’s not exactly beautiful, but it’ll do.

    android:keyWidth="10%p"     android:horizontalGap="3px"     android:verticalGap="3px"     android:keyHeight="60dp"     android:keyTextColor="@color/colorAccent"     android:keyBackground="@color/colorPrimaryDark" At your service

Code

public class MyInputMethodService extends InputMethodService implements KeyboardView.OnKeyboardActionListener {     public MyInputMethodService() {         super();     }         @Override     public void onPress(int i) {     }     @Override     public void onRelease(int i) {     }     @Override     public void onKey(int i, int[] ints) {     }     @Override     public void onText(CharSequence charSequence) {     }     @Override     public void swipeLeft() {     }     @Override     public void swipeRight() {     }     @Override     public void swipeDown() {     }     @Override     public void swipeUp() {     }

Code

private KeyboardView keyboardView; private Keyboard keyboard; private boolean caps = false; @Override public View onCreateInputView() {     keyboardView = (KeyboardView) getLayoutInflater().inflate(R.layout.keyboard_view, null);     keyboard = new Keyboard(this, R.xml.keys_layout);     keyboardView.setKeyboard(keyboard);     keyboardView.setOnKeyboardActionListener(this);     return keyboardView;

Code

@Override public void onKey(int primaryCode, int[] keyCodes) {     InputConnection inputConnection = getCurrentInputConnection();     if (inputConnection != null) {         switch(primaryCode) {             case Keyboard.KEYCODE_DELETE :                 CharSequence selectedText = inputConnection.getSelectedText(0);                 if (TextUtils.isEmpty(selectedText)) {                     inputConnection.deleteSurroundingText(1, 0);                 } else {                 }             case Keyboard.KEYCODE_SHIFT:                 caps = !caps;                 keyboard.setShifted(caps);                 keyboardView.invalidateAllKeys();                 break;             case Keyboard.KEYCODE_DONE:                 inputConnection.sendKeyEvent(new KeyEvent(KeyEvent.ACTION_DOWN, KeyEvent.KEYCODE_ENTER));                 break;             default :                 char code = (char) primaryCode;                 if(Character.isLetter(code) && caps){                     code = Character.toUpperCase(code);                 }         }     }

Code

public class MyInputMethodService extends InputMethodService implements KeyboardView.OnKeyboardActionListener {     private KeyboardView keyboardView;     private Keyboard keyboard;     private boolean caps = false;     @Override     public View onCreateInputView() {         keyboardView = (KeyboardView) getLayoutInflater().inflate(R.layout.keyboard_view, null);         keyboard = new Keyboard(this, R.xml.keys_layout);         keyboardView.setKeyboard(keyboard);         keyboardView.setOnKeyboardActionListener(this);         return keyboardView;     }     @Override     public void onPress(int i) {     }     @Override     public void onRelease(int i) {     }     @Override     public void onKey(int primaryCode, int[] keyCodes) {         InputConnection inputConnection = getCurrentInputConnection();         if (inputConnection != null) {             switch(primaryCode) {                 case Keyboard.KEYCODE_DELETE :                     CharSequence selectedText = inputConnection.getSelectedText(0);                     if (TextUtils.isEmpty(selectedText)) {                         inputConnection.deleteSurroundingText(1, 0);                     } else {                     }                 case Keyboard.KEYCODE_SHIFT:                     caps = !caps;                     keyboard.setShifted(caps);                     keyboardView.invalidateAllKeys();                     break;                 case Keyboard.KEYCODE_DONE:                     inputConnection.sendKeyEvent(new KeyEvent(KeyEvent.ACTION_DOWN, KeyEvent.KEYCODE_ENTER));                     break;                 default :                     char code = (char) primaryCode;                     if(Character.isLetter(code) && caps){                         code = Character.toUpperCase(code);                     }             }         }     }     @Override     public void onText(CharSequence charSequence) {     }     @Override     public void swipeLeft() {     }     @Override     public void swipeRight() {     }     @Override     public void swipeDown() {     }     @Override     public void swipeUp() {     } } Testing it out and customization

Code

private void playSound(int keyCode){ v.vibrate(20); am = (AudioManager)getSystemService(AUDIO_SERVICE); switch(keyCode){ case 32: am.playSoundEffect(AudioManager.FX_KEYPRESS_SPACEBAR); break; case Keyboard.KEYCODE_DONE: case 10: am.playSoundEffect(AudioManager.FX_KEYPRESS_RETURN); break; case Keyboard.KEYCODE_DELETE: am.playSoundEffect(AudioManager.FX_KEYPRESS_DELETE); break; default: am.playSoundEffect(AudioManager.FX_KEYPRESS_STANDARD); } }

Now just use playSound() at the top of the onKey method and make sure to create a vibrator and audio manager (private AudioManager am; private Virbator v;). You could just as easily swap out the key sounds for your own in the assets folder, or change the duration and behavior of the virbration.

Type I With Accent Marks On Iphone & Android Phone (Î, Ï, Ì, Í)

Accented characters, such as the letter “I” with accent marks, are indispensable for effective communication in some languages. These diacritical marks modify the pronunciation and add layers of meaning to written words.

In this comprehensive tutorial, we will delve into the world of typing i with accents on iPhone and Android devices. By exploring different methods, shortcuts, and keyboard options, you will gain the mastery needed to effortlessly incorporate these accents into your texting or writing on your phone.

Before we embark on a journey to unlock the power of typing “I” with accent marks, empowering you to communicate with precision and clarity, let’s understand its importance first. 

Related Post: How to Type i with Accent Marks on Computer Keyboard

You can also use the table of content below to jump straight to the tutorials.

Accented characters play a vital role in effective communication, allowing us to express ourselves accurately in various languages. Among these characters, the letter “I” with accent marks holds particular significance. They serve as linguistic guideposts, helping us navigate the intricate paths of pronunciation and linguistic nuances.

In different languages, the accented “I” characters bring forth distinct sounds and meanings. For instance, the acute accent (í) might indicate a long /i/ vowel (ee in English word feel), while the grave accent (ì) can suggest a different vowel quality. The circumflex accent (î) often signifies a change in pronunciation, and the umlaut/diaeresis (ï) alters the sound of the letter “I” altogether. Furthermore, the tilde (ĩ) adds a nasal quality to the pronunciation, lending depth and richness to the language.

By embracing these accented “I” characters and understanding their functionalities, we open ourselves to a world of clearer communication and cultural appreciation. We enable ourselves to engage with language in a more profound and meaningful way, respecting the linguistic subtleties that different accents bring.

In the following sections, we will now explore the methods, shortcuts, and keyboard options available on both iPhone and Android devices to type these i with accent characters effortlessly. 

Both Android and iPhone devices provide a range of default keyboard options, each with its own approach to accessing “I with accent” characters. 

Understanding these options will enable you to effortlessly type these accents.

Let’s explore the best methods.

An easy method to access accentedi with accents on Android devices is by utilizing long-press gestures. 

Simply press and hold the “I” key on your Android keyboard, and a popup menu will appear, presenting you with various accented versions of the letter “I,” including í, ì, î, ï, and ĩ, among others.

Select the desired accented “I” character from the menu to insert it into your text. 

This intuitive method allows for quick access to any “I with accent” while typing on Android devices.

Similar to Android devices, iPhones offer this unique and default keyboard options to facilitate typing “I with accent” letters. 

To access these I with accent marks on iPhone, long-press the “I” key on your iPhone keyboard. A popup menu will appear, displaying accented versions of the letter “I,” including í, ì, î, ï, and ĩ, among others.

Slide your finger to select the desired accented “I” letter, and it will be inserted into your text. 

This method ensures quick and intuitive typing of the letter I with an accent on iPhone devices.

To expedite your typing of accented “I” characters, both Android and iPhone devices offer shortcuts and special characters as explained above. 

These shortcuts allow you to quickly insert the accented “I” characters without the need for additional menus or gestures.

Let’s take a look at some examples:

On Android devices, you can utilize the following shortcuts:

To type “í”: Long-press the “I” key and select the acute accent option.

To type “ì”: Long-press the “I” key and select the grave accent option.

To type “î”: Long-press the “I” key and select the circumflex accent option.

To type “ï”: Long-press the “I” key and select the umlaut/diaeresis accent option.

To type “ĩ”: Long-press the “I” key and select the tilde accent option.

On iPhone devices, you can use the following shortcuts:

To type “í”: Long-press the “I” key and swipe upwards on the popup menu to select the acute accent option.

To type “ì”: Long-press the “I” key and swipe upwards on the popup menu to select the grave accent option.

To type “î”: Long-press the “I” key and swipe upwards on the popup menu to select the circumflex accent option.

To type “ï”: Long-press the “I” key and swipe upwards on the popup menu to select the umlaut/diaeresis accent option.

To type “ĩ”: Long-press the “I” key and swipe upwards on the popup menu to select the tilde accent option.

These shortcuts can significantly speed up your typing process once you become familiar with them.

Text replacements, also known as keyboard shortcuts, can save you time and effort, especially when frequently using special characters like “I with accent marks.” 

On your iPhone, you can set up text replacements to automatically convert into the desired I with accent marks whenever you type a certain string of characters

Here’s how to set up text replacements:

Open the Settings app on your iPhone.

Scroll down and tap on General.

Select Keyboard and then choose Text Replacement.

Tap on the “+” button to create a new text replacement.

In the Phrase field, enter the accented “I” character you want to assign to the shortcut. You can copy and paste the character from a reliable source or website.

In the Shortcut field, input the abbreviation or shortcut that triggers the expansion. For example, you can use “ii” for í, “ig” for ì, “ic” for î, “iu” for ï, and “itd” for ĩ. Ensure that the abbreviation you use is not a valid word.

Tap Save to confirm.

Now, whenever you type the designated shortcut on your iPhone keyboard, it will automatically expand into the corresponding accented “I” character.

If you’re using an Android device, you can also add a keyboard text shortcut to help you type “I with accent marks” easily. 

Follow these instructions:

Open the Keyboard Settings on your Android device. You can find it by going to the Settings app and searching for “Language & Input” or “Keyboard.”

Access the Text Correction or Text Shortcuts settings, depending on your device.

Look for an option called “Personal dictionary” or “Personal dictionary settings” and tap on it.

Add a new shortcut by tapping on the “+” or “Add” button.

Enter the shortcut or abbreviation you want to use to trigger the accented “I” character in the Shortcut field.

Enter the particular I with an accent character corresponding to the shortcut in the Phrase field. You can use the long-press method to type it or copy the desired character from a reliable source or website.

Save the new text shortcut.

Now, when you type the shortcut you’ve created on your Android keyboard, it will automatically expand into the corresponding accented “I” character.

Mastering the art of typing I with accent characters on Android and iPhone devices enhances your ability to communicate effectively in multiple languages. 

By understanding the functionality of accented “I” characters and familiarizing yourself with the different methods, shortcuts, and keyboard options available, you can effortlessly incorporate these accents into your written text.

Throughout this user-friendly guide, we have explored the importance of accurately typing accented “I” characters and the impact they have on pronunciation and conveying meaning. We also explained the various methods of typing i with accent marks on both iPhone and Android devices. With this knowledge and practice, you’ll be able to type and communicate with ease and confidence.

Thank you for reading this guide, and happy typing!

How To Capture A Scrolling Screenshot On Android

There are several ways to take a screenshot on Android, but the simplest and most basic one is holding down the Power and Volume Down buttons for a second, and that’s it.

A typical screenshot will only capture what appears on the active screen though. If you want to capture a long conversation, webpage, or multiple posts in your social feed, you may have to repeat the process several times over, which is a tedious process.

Table of Contents

Fortunately, you can capture a scrolling screenshot on your Android device and save yourself the trouble of having to meticulously stitch the screenshots together.

Most top-of-the-range Android devices have the built-in Scroll Capture option, but if yours doesn’t, you can use a third-party app that’ll do the job just fine. We’re going to show you how to use both options to achieve this.

How To Capture a Scrolling Screenshot On Android

Using the native screen capture feature.

Using a third-party app.

Using The Native Screen Capture Feature

Scrolling screenshots weren’t a part of Android devices until a user asked Google to implement it. Initially, Google said the feature was infeasible but later confirmed that it was, in fact, possible to implement it.

A select number of Android devices like Samsung, OnePlus, LG and Huawei offer the scrolling screenshots feature under different monikers.

For Samsung users, the feature, now called Scroll Capture, was first introduced through the nifty Capture more tool on the Note 5 handset, which enabled them to take long screenshots in one file. On other devices like Huawei, it’s known as Scrollshot, LG has the ‘Extended’ option, MIUI has the Scroll option, and OnePlus calls it ‘Scrolling’ or Expanded screenshot’.

We’ll show you how to capture long screenshots using the built-in tools on a Samsung and Huawei device.

Capture Scrolling screenshots On a Samsung

1. Enable Smart Capture on your device by opening Settings. Tap Advanced Features.

2. Find Smart Capture and toggle the switch to enable it.

3. Go to the screen you’d like to capture and take a screenshot. The Scroll Capture icon will appear next to the Crop, Edit, and Share icons. Tap it and scroll to where you’d like it to end.

4. You’ll see a little preview of the captured screenshot on the lower left side of the screen. If you’d like to modify the screenshot, you can open it from the Gallery under the Screenshots folder, make the necessary changes and save it for later.

Capture Scrolling Screenshots On a Huawei

1. Open the screen you’d like to take a scrolling screenshot of and hold down the Volume down and Power buttons to capture the screenshot. An animation will appear shortly to let you know the image has been captured successfully. Tap the Scrollshot option at the bottom of the screen just before the animation disappears.

2. Your phone will start scrolling down, but you can tap the screen to stop at the point where you’d like the screenshot to end. The image result will appear on your display after which you can edit, share or delete the screenshot.

Using a Third-Party App

If your Android device doesn’t have the native Scrollshot or scroll capture tool, you can use a third-party app to capture scrolling screenshots. 

There are several apps in the Google Play Store that can help you capture long screenshots. But in this guide, we’ll be using the LongShot app.

How To Use The LongShot App To Capture Scrolling Screenshots

LongShot is ideal for capturing screenshots of long articles or news feeds and delivers flawless, pixel-perfect results in one rolling screenshot.

Unlike other apps, LongShot doesn’t add annoying watermarks on your screenshots. The free app is ad-supported, though they’re non-intrusive and you can close them any time you want. But for a small fee (about $2), you can have them removed and enjoy an ad-free experience.

1. Download and install LongShot. Launch the app to take the screenshot.

2. If you want the app to capture the scrolling shot automatically, tap the checkbox next to Auto-scroll. 

4. Next, tap the blue button to the right of the Capture Screenshot button. The app will require permission to show things on top of other apps you’re using. Toggle the Allow Permission switch on.

5. A popup will appear notifying you that LongShot will start capturing everything displayed on your screen. Tap Start now to continue with the screen capture.

7. A red line will appear on the screen to help you pick an end point as you scroll. Tap the floating Done (red) button to stop the scrolling shot capture.

8. In the new screen, you can edit or adjust the captured screenshot. If you want, you can keep the original screen capture by selecting the Also keep original screenshots when saving checkbox at the top.

9. Tap Save when you’re done with the edits.

10. The resulting image will be displayed on your screen, with three options below it: Browse (to open the location of the image in the LongShot folder), Rate (to rate the app), and New (to take a new scrolling screenshot).

Besides taking long screenshots, the LongShot app also has a few other useful tools like the stitching tool that lets you connect multiple screenshots.

Conclusion

Vmos Review: Running A Virtual Machine In Android

A virtual machine is an emulation of a computer system. I always run a virtual machine when I need to test a software or features that are only available on another OS. For example, on my Linux laptop, I run a Windows virtual machine and use it to test all Windows software and functionality. It is pretty easy to set up a virtual machine on desktop, too.

But what about running a virtual machine on your Android phone? Is that even possible? In this review we test VMOS, a virtual machine for Android, see how it performs and whether it is really useful to run a virtual machine on your phone.

Note:This is a sponsored article and was made possible by VMOS. The actual contents and opinions are the sole views of the author who maintains editorial independence, even when a post is sponsored.

VMOS allows you to run a virtual Android OS on your Android phone. As a virtual machine requires plenty of system resources, this will only work well on an Android phone with great specs. If your phone has less than 3GB RAM and 32GB storage, you won’t be able to run VMOS (I haven’t tried it with those specs, but your phone might crash).

There are a few benefits of running a virtual machine on your phone:

1. Run two instances of an app simultaneously

That is, if you have the needs to run several instances of an app. You might have two Facebook accounts – one for family and another for work – and want to access them at the same time. Or you probably have two instances of the same game running with different accounts. The best is to have access to two Google Play Stores so you can install different sets of apps for different Google accounts.

2. Run Google Play Store on Android phone that doesn’t support Google Play Store

It is easy to associate Google Play store with Android phone, but there are plenty of Android phones that don’t come with support for it. This could be your Amazon phone or even the latest Huawei Mate 30 that is banned by the US government. By running VMOS as a virtual machine on your phone, you can have access to Google Play Store to install your apps.

3. Run Root apps without rooting your phone 4. App running in background

VMOS is always running in the background. If you have apps that you want to constantly run, VMOS is useful for that.

5. Run apps in Floating Window

If you love to multitask, you can run VMOS in Floating Window mode (like watching video), and check your messages at the same time.

Get Started

1. To get started, download and install the VMOS apk app from its website. Your phone needs to have at least 3GB ram and 32GB of free storage space for it to work.

2. Launch the VMOS app. On the first run, it will download and install the ROM to your phone. This will take a while.

On subsequent launches, it will just boot up the virtual machine, just like when you reboot your Android phone .

3. Once the VM finishes booting, it will launch as a full screen app with a home launcher. The interface is the same as any Android home screen.

4. You can swipe up the screen to access the app drawer. It is pretty barebones with only a few pre-installed apps.

5. You can also access the Settings of VMOS by selecting the Settings app.

The resolution setting allows you to configure the VM’s screen resolution. The default is 1080×2340 (this is properly tied to the screen size of your phone), but you can add a new resolution for it to run on.

The Floating Window setting allows you to configure if it should run in a floating window mode. The default is “On,” but you can easily toggle it off.

The “Virtual Button” setting is where you can turn off the floating button that is at the side of the screen. This is “On” by default.

And this is what the virtual button looks like. It functions as the VM navigation button, allowing you to “Go Back,” “Go Home” and see “Recent Apps.” You can also change the resolution or minimize the VM with a tap.

Going into the System Settings, you can easily see that this VM is based on Android 5.1.1. According to the developer, they are working on a VM based on Android 9 that should roll out soon.

6. To install apps in VMOS, you need to add an account in the Play Store in the VM. Once you install apps from the Play Store, you can use it just like the usual apps on your Android phone. Below is a screenshot showing two instances of Sudoku running: one in the VM and the other in the native Android system.

7. If you need to install apps that require root access, you have to enable it first. In the System Settings, tap seven times on the Build number to activate “Developer Options.” Then in the “Developer Options,” enable the “ROOT” option. You will need to restart VMOS after enabling root.

Some issues I found with VMOS

1. On my phone that has 6GB of RAM, there are times when apps in VMOS are still running slow. Some of the apps took a few seconds to load and run.

2. The Internet access is spotty. It can work from the start, but the connection drops after a while. I need to turn off the Wi-Fi, and turn on again for the network to reconnect.

Conclusion

Personally, I have not found a use case for VMOS. In my years of using a smartphone, I have not had an instance where I needed to run a second instance of an app simultaneously. But that could be me and the way I am using my phone. It could be different for you. I do feel that on a tablet, or a phone with a large screen, VMOS can be a useful addition for you to multitask and access two different apps simultaneously.

Damien

Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

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