Trending February 2024 # How To Reverse The Mouse Scrolling Direction In Ubuntu (Aka Natural Scrolling) # Suggested March 2024 # Top 5 Popular

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When Apple releases Mac OSX Lion, one of the changes is the switching of the trackpad/mouse scrolling direction. Instead of scrolling the mouse wheel down to move down the page, you have to scroll up to move down. Apple imported this feature from iOS and call this feature “natural scrolling”. Not everyone love this feature, but if you are one of those who love it, and wish to implement this feature in Ubuntu, here’s how you do it:

Open a terminal. Type:

gksu gedit

    Paste the following to the text file.

      Save the file with the name ‘.Xmodmap’ (without the quote, but with the dot in front) in your Home folder.

      Close the file and terminal.

      Log out and log in again. Your mouse scrolling direction should change now.

      To revert the setting, simply delete/remove the .Xmodmap file.

      If you are using KDE (Kubuntu), the tweak is slightly different.

      That’s it.

      Note: There is another app call naturalscrolling. I have tried it in Ubuntu Oneiric beta and it doesn’t work. If you are keen to try it out, here is how you can install it:

      Open a terminal and type:

      sudo

      add-apt-repository ppa:zedtux

      /

      naturalscrolling

      sudo

      apt-get update

      sudo

      apt-get install

      naturalscrolling

      If everything goes well for you, you should see an appindicator where you can tick to change the mouse scrolling direction. Let me know how it works for you.

      Damien

      Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

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      You're reading How To Reverse The Mouse Scrolling Direction In Ubuntu (Aka Natural Scrolling)

      How To Capture A Scrolling Screenshot On Android

      There are several ways to take a screenshot on Android, but the simplest and most basic one is holding down the Power and Volume Down buttons for a second, and that’s it.

      A typical screenshot will only capture what appears on the active screen though. If you want to capture a long conversation, webpage, or multiple posts in your social feed, you may have to repeat the process several times over, which is a tedious process.

      Table of Contents

      Fortunately, you can capture a scrolling screenshot on your Android device and save yourself the trouble of having to meticulously stitch the screenshots together.

      Most top-of-the-range Android devices have the built-in Scroll Capture option, but if yours doesn’t, you can use a third-party app that’ll do the job just fine. We’re going to show you how to use both options to achieve this.

      How To Capture a Scrolling Screenshot On Android

      Using the native screen capture feature.

      Using a third-party app.

      Using The Native Screen Capture Feature

      Scrolling screenshots weren’t a part of Android devices until a user asked Google to implement it. Initially, Google said the feature was infeasible but later confirmed that it was, in fact, possible to implement it.

      A select number of Android devices like Samsung, OnePlus, LG and Huawei offer the scrolling screenshots feature under different monikers.

      For Samsung users, the feature, now called Scroll Capture, was first introduced through the nifty Capture more tool on the Note 5 handset, which enabled them to take long screenshots in one file. On other devices like Huawei, it’s known as Scrollshot, LG has the ‘Extended’ option, MIUI has the Scroll option, and OnePlus calls it ‘Scrolling’ or Expanded screenshot’.

      We’ll show you how to capture long screenshots using the built-in tools on a Samsung and Huawei device.

      Capture Scrolling screenshots On a Samsung

      1. Enable Smart Capture on your device by opening Settings. Tap Advanced Features.

      2. Find Smart Capture and toggle the switch to enable it.

      3. Go to the screen you’d like to capture and take a screenshot. The Scroll Capture icon will appear next to the Crop, Edit, and Share icons. Tap it and scroll to where you’d like it to end.

      4. You’ll see a little preview of the captured screenshot on the lower left side of the screen. If you’d like to modify the screenshot, you can open it from the Gallery under the Screenshots folder, make the necessary changes and save it for later.

      Capture Scrolling Screenshots On a Huawei

      1. Open the screen you’d like to take a scrolling screenshot of and hold down the Volume down and Power buttons to capture the screenshot. An animation will appear shortly to let you know the image has been captured successfully. Tap the Scrollshot option at the bottom of the screen just before the animation disappears.

      2. Your phone will start scrolling down, but you can tap the screen to stop at the point where you’d like the screenshot to end. The image result will appear on your display after which you can edit, share or delete the screenshot.

      Using a Third-Party App

      If your Android device doesn’t have the native Scrollshot or scroll capture tool, you can use a third-party app to capture scrolling screenshots. 

      There are several apps in the Google Play Store that can help you capture long screenshots. But in this guide, we’ll be using the LongShot app.

      How To Use The LongShot App To Capture Scrolling Screenshots

      LongShot is ideal for capturing screenshots of long articles or news feeds and delivers flawless, pixel-perfect results in one rolling screenshot.

      Unlike other apps, LongShot doesn’t add annoying watermarks on your screenshots. The free app is ad-supported, though they’re non-intrusive and you can close them any time you want. But for a small fee (about $2), you can have them removed and enjoy an ad-free experience.

      1. Download and install LongShot. Launch the app to take the screenshot.

      2. If you want the app to capture the scrolling shot automatically, tap the checkbox next to Auto-scroll. 

      4. Next, tap the blue button to the right of the Capture Screenshot button. The app will require permission to show things on top of other apps you’re using. Toggle the Allow Permission switch on.

      5. A popup will appear notifying you that LongShot will start capturing everything displayed on your screen. Tap Start now to continue with the screen capture.

      7. A red line will appear on the screen to help you pick an end point as you scroll. Tap the floating Done (red) button to stop the scrolling shot capture.

      8. In the new screen, you can edit or adjust the captured screenshot. If you want, you can keep the original screen capture by selecting the Also keep original screenshots when saving checkbox at the top.

      9. Tap Save when you’re done with the edits.

      10. The resulting image will be displayed on your screen, with three options below it: Browse (to open the location of the image in the LongShot folder), Rate (to rate the app), and New (to take a new scrolling screenshot).

      Besides taking long screenshots, the LongShot app also has a few other useful tools like the stitching tool that lets you connect multiple screenshots.

      Conclusion

      Learn How To Install Smplayer In Ubuntu

      SMPlayer is a free media player for windows and Linux with built-in codecs, which will additionally play YouTube videos, search and down load subtitles, and entails other points like a thumbnail generator and audio and video filters.

      Features

      Help for Youtube. That you can search, play and down-load Youtube movies

      Many video and audio filters are available

      Thumbnail generator

      Video equaliser

      It has many Skins/Themes

      It supports a couple of speed playback

      It supports audio and subtitles delay adjustment

      Installing SMPlayer

      To install SMPlayer, add the following PPA on Ubuntu−

      $sudo add-apt-repository ppa:rvm/smplayer

      The sample output should be like this −

      Packages for SMPlayer. To install SMPlayer from this PPA, run these commands on a terminal: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:rvm/smplayer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install smplayer smtube smplayer-themes smplayer-skins Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it gpg: keyring `/tmp/tmpeab9bvoh/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring `/tmp/tmpeab9bvoh/pubring.gpg' created gpg: chúng tôi trustdb created gpg: key E4A4F4F4: public key "Launchpad PPA named smplayer for rvm" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 gpg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK

      Now update the packages by using the following command −

      $sudo apt-get update .................................................................................................

      To install SMplayer with skins, use the following command −

      $ sudo apt-get install smplayer smplayer-themes smplayer-skins

      The sample output should be like this −

      Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done The following additional packages will be installed: esound-common libaudiofile1 libdirectfb-1.2-9 libenca0 libesd0 libgif7 libqt4-opengl libqtwebkit4 libsdl1.2debian libvorbisidec1 mplayer smtube Suggested packages: The following NEW packages will be installed: esound-common libaudiofile1 libdirectfb-1.2-9 libenca0 libesd0 libgif7 libqt4-opengl libqtwebkit4 libsdl1.2debian libvorbisidec1 mplayer smplayer smplayer-skins smplayer-themes smtube 0 upgraded, 15 newly installed, 0 to remove and 284 not upgraded. Need to get 18.9 MB of archives. After this operation, 66.8 MB of additional disk space will be used. Do you want to continue? [Y/n] y .................................................................................

      To open SMplayer, use the following command −

      $ smplayer Usage: smplayer [-minigui] [-defaultgui] [-mpcgui] [-config-path directory] [-send-action action_name] [-actions action_list] [-close-at-end] [-no-close-at-end] [-fullscreen] [-no-fullscreen] [-ontop] [-no-ontop] [-sub subtitle_file] [-pos x y] [-size width height] [-add-to-playlist] -minigui: opens the mini gui instead of the default one. -mpcgui: opens the mpc gui. -defaultgui: opens the default gui. -skingui: opens the gui with support for skins. -config-path: specifies the directory where smplayer will store its configuration files (smplayer.ini, smplayer_files.ini...) -send-action: tries to make a connection to another running instance and send to it the specified action. Example: -send-action pause The rest of options (if any) will be ignored and the application will exit. It will return 0 on success or -1 on failure. -actions: action_list is a list of actions separated by spaces. The actions will be executed just after loading the file (if any) in the same order you entered. For checkable actions you can pass true or false as parameter. Example: -actions "fullscreen compact true". Quotes are necessary in case you pass more than one action. -close-at-end: the main window will be closed when the file/playlist finishes. -no-close-at-end: the main window won't be closed when the file/playlist finishes. -fullscreen: the video will be played in fullscreen mode. -no-fullscreen: the video will be played in window mode. -ontop: sets the stay on top option to always. -no-ontop: sets the stay on top option to never. -sub: specifies the subtitle file to be loaded for the first video. -media-title: sets the media title for the first video. -pos: specifies the coordinates where the main window will be displayed. -size: specifies the size of the main window. -help: will show this message and then will exit. -add-to-playlist: if there's another instance running, the media will be added to that instance's playlist. If there's no other instance, this option will be ignored and the files will be opened in a new instance. media: 'media' is any kind of file that SMPlayer can open. It can be a local file, a DVD (e.g. dvd://1), an Internet stream (e.g. mms://....) or a local playlist in format m3u or pls.

      After this article, you will be able to understand how to install SMPlayer in Ubuntu. In our next articles, we will come up with more Linux based tricks and tips. Keep reading!

      Source: SMPlayer Portal

      How To Easily Mount Iso Images In Ubuntu

      In the past, if you need to mount an ISO file in Ubuntu, you will have to use an external tool or via the command line. In the recent version of Ubuntu, you can easily mount an ISO directly from Nautilus file manager. Here is how you can do it:

      1. Open Files (also known as Nautilus) and navigate to the folder that contains the ISO file.

      Your ISO will magically mounted in Files and you will be able to view the content within.

      Damien

      Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

      Subscribe to our newsletter!

      Our latest tutorials delivered straight to your inbox

      Sign up for all newsletters.

      By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy. We will not share your data and you can unsubscribe at any time.

      How To Easily Kill An Unresponsive Application In Ubuntu

      Using the System Monitor

      1. Open the System Monitor app. In the Processes tab, scroll down the list until you find the unresponsive app.

      Once confirmed, this will kill the unresponsive application.

      Using a keyboard shortcut

      You can assign a custom keyboard shortcut to kill an application when it becomes unresponsive.

      That’s it.

      Damien

      Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

      Subscribe to our newsletter!

      Our latest tutorials delivered straight to your inbox

      Sign up for all newsletters.

      By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy. We will not share your data and you can unsubscribe at any time.

      How To Install And Update Google Chrome In Ubuntu

      Most users who want to install Google Chrome in Ubuntu tend to use an App Store or go through Ubuntu Software. What they don’t know is that Google Chrome isn’t available in any major Linux distribution archives, so it can’t be installed directly from the Software Center. Here we show you how to install Google Chrome in Ubuntu.

      Download and Install Google Chrome

      Since Google Chrome is not found in the Software Center, we need to download the installer from its website.

      Select the package for your Linux platform. This may be the 64-bit .deb (for Debian/Ubuntu), 64-bit .rpm (for Fedora/openSUSE), or, if you don’t use either of those, you can get a community-supported version.

      Note: if you are using Arch Linux, Google Chrome is found in the AUR. You can install it with any of these AUR helpers.

      If this didn’t work for you, try a direct download of Google Chrome for Linux.

      If prompted, enter your password.

      Wait until the Software Installer installs the Chrome browser.

      Customize your options.

      Enjoy the Google Chrome browser on Ubuntu.

      Install Chrome Using Flatpak Library

      If you prefer a more direct method of obtaining Chrome, try using Flatpak. Chrome browser is available on Flathub; however, Google doesn’t support or manage the application on the platform, so you will be installing the package at your own risk. (You can learn how to install Flatpak on Ubuntu and other distributions.)

      Open the Terminal and type the following command:

      flatpak

      install

      flathub com.google.Chrome

      Press Y , then Enter.

      Let the Terminal download packages and install the browser.

      Chrome will be installed successfully on Linux PC.

      Open the menu and search for the browser.

      There are a few ways to update Google Chrome on your Ubuntu machine. By default, on a regular update, the system will update Google Chrome, too. But if it fails to update on its own, you can use any of the following methods to manually update Google Chrome on your machine.

      Use Software Center

      Search and open “Software Center” from the menu.

      Note: if your Ubuntu Software center is not working, we have fixes here.

      Use Command Line

      Open a terminal.

      Run the sudo apt update command in the Terminal.

      Type sudo apt --only-upgrade install google-chrome-stable command to upgrade Google Chrome only.

      Use Software Updater

      Open “Software Updater” from the menu.

      Select “Other Software” from the top menu.

      Check the box beside the APT Line of the Google repository and close the window.

      The Software Updater will notify you of new software updates when they are available for your computer.

      Tip: not keen on using Ubuntu? Check out other Debian-based Linux distributions here.

      Frequently Asked Questions Is there a Google Chrome package for 32-bit Ubuntu?

      No, Google axed the Chrome 32-bit version in 2024.

      Is Flatpak Google Chrome safe?

      While Flatpak is an open-source project, the Chrome package on the platform isn’t monitored or managed by Google. You have to install it at your own risk.

      Do I need to add the Google Chrome repository separately?

      The Chrome DEB or RPM package has the repository info and saves it in the computer after installation. You don’t have to register the repository separately.

      Do I have to update the Flatpak packages separately?

      Flatpak updates appear along with the system updates. You don’t have to add the Flathub repository or download additional tools to receive or update the applications. Use the universal command sudo apt update and install Flatpak app updates.

      All screenshots by Krishna Kumar Silvery.

      Krishna Kumar

      I’m a passionate writer.

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