Trending March 2024 # How To Easily Kill An Unresponsive Application In Ubuntu # Suggested April 2024 # Top 8 Popular

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Using the System Monitor

1. Open the System Monitor app. In the Processes tab, scroll down the list until you find the unresponsive app.

Once confirmed, this will kill the unresponsive application.

Using a keyboard shortcut

You can assign a custom keyboard shortcut to kill an application when it becomes unresponsive.

That’s it.

Damien

Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

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How To Easily Mount Iso Images In Ubuntu

In the past, if you need to mount an ISO file in Ubuntu, you will have to use an external tool or via the command line. In the recent version of Ubuntu, you can easily mount an ISO directly from Nautilus file manager. Here is how you can do it:

1. Open Files (also known as Nautilus) and navigate to the folder that contains the ISO file.

Your ISO will magically mounted in Files and you will be able to view the content within.

Damien

Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

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Our latest tutorials delivered straight to your inbox

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Unleashing An Epidemic To Kill The Tumbleweeds

Dana Berner wants to start an epidemic among tumbleweeds. Berner is a pathologist with the U.S. Agricultural Research Service who studies the diseases that afflict plants. One of his projects has been a search for something that’s able to infect and kill the iconic, spiny, rolling weed of the American West.

After about a decade of research—plus more work, done by predecessors—he thinks he’s got an answer: Two fungi species that hail from the Eurasian steppes to which tumbleweed is native. He and his colleagues have submitted applications to release these exotic fungi on willing U.S. farmers’ lands. Now they’re just waiting for an answer.

“I’m very optimistic on its ability to control tumbleweed. We just need to get it released,” Berner tells Popular Science. “We have lots of evidence on it that it’s safe and effective.”

“It eliminated tumbleweed in fields, within one to two years. Gone.”

What’s Berner’s problem with this quirky Western icon? As American as they may seem, tumbleweeds aren’t native to the U.S. They were introduced here, accidentally, in a shipment of flaxseeds, in the 1870s. Without the predators and diseases that normally munch at them in places like Russia and Hungary, they can grow in incredible numbers.

Tumbleweeds can take over farmland, crowding out crops or forage that cattle are able to eat. (Cattle don’t eat tumbleweed.) They can pile up against houses, creating a fire hazard. (“I had a call from another fellow in California, just recently, who’s just terrified of the fire risk,” Berner says.) In 1989, a North Dakotan town of 4,000 spent $8,500 to dig itself out from a pileup that blocked streets and houses; similar scenarios have happened this year across the west. That’s not to say tumbleweeds aren’t beloved by some… but others could do with fewer of them. Yet farmers and ranchers don’t often want to plunk down the money to kill them off with chemical herbicides. The type of land tumbleweeds grow on tends not to be very valuable, agriculturally. So they persist, with each tumbling ball scattering up to a quarter million seeds as it rolls.

A Green, Growing Tumbleweed

The Agricultural Research Service got a first glimpse of a possible solution in the 1990s. At the time, plant pathologists in Hungary noticed a fungus infecting and killing local tumbleweeds. Knowing the Americans would be interested, they mailed a sample to the Agricultural Research Service’s Foreign Disease-Weed Science Research Unit in Fort Detrick, Maryland.

Since then, Berner and his colleagues has been studying that fungus, Colletotrichum salsolae, alongside another fungus called Uromyces salsolae. They’ve been checking what the fungi kill and don’t kill. The latest studies included field tests of C. salsolae in Greece and Russia, where C. salsolae already grows. Berner describes the results of a study they performed by renting a patch of land from a Greek farmer with a tumbleweed problem. “It eliminated tumbleweed in fields, within one to two years. Gone.”

The fungi work against the tumbleweeds when they are saplings, so they don’t have the chance to grow into large bushes, which would later dry out, snap off their roots, and roll around while dispersing their seeds.

Stem of a Tumbleweed Infected with C. Salsolae Fungus

The safety tests included inoculating plants of species related to the Salsola tragus tumbleweed that C. salsolae and U. salsolae target. The plant researchers wanted to make sure that if released, the fungi wouldn’t kill native plants. Those tests were performed in a biosafety level 3 greenhouse, a precaution that was meant to protect not the human researchers, who aren’t susceptible to the diseases studied in the greenhouse, but all of the plants outside of it. Scientists have to shower before leaving the greenhouse.

Not every plant species gets a greenhouse test, however. Some species are difficult to find or cultivate. So Berner and his colleagues ran a mathematical model on all of their species that estimates the extent to which a species is susceptible to certain pathogens, based on its genetics. The model is a widely used one for checking what species a “biological control agent”—a living thing meant to kill weeds or pests—will affect.

The team checked 89 species’ vulnerability to C. salsolae, plus 64 species’ vulnerability to U. salsolae. Only a few species were vulnerable to infection at all. Those that were didn’t seem to suffer in overall health from the infection. One helpful fact: Plant diseases tend to infect closely related species and there are no plants native to the U.S. that share tumbleweeds’ genus, Salsola.

Now it’s a question of waiting, which depends in part on whether the approval committee is convinced by Berner and his coworkers’ safety tests. The team submitted one application, for U. salsolae, in 2009. They haven’t yet received an answer. They submitted their application for C. salsolae this year.

Should the approval go through, spreading the fungi will be cheap and easy. Scientists infect otherwise sterilized rice with the fungi, then dump a half-kilogram pile of the rice every 5,000 meters in the fields of those who want it. Rain and tumbleweeds’ tumbling will do the rest.

“It will eventually spread,” Berner says. “Ultimately, it’s going to spread as far as tumbleweed spread.”

How To Easily Revert An Accidental Language Change In Os X

Luckily for you, if you’ve encountered a similar issue, we’ve got the solution for you. The thing is, if you do change the language, the layout essentially stays the same. There are two methods to easily switch back to your preferred language, either via. System Preferences, or by Terminal. We’ve detailed both of these methods below.

Switch Back To Your Preferred Language Using System Preferences:

1. First, open “System Preferences” by opening the Apple Menu and selecting the fourth item on the list. It will be immediately under the first separator bar, as shown below:

2. Next, in System Preferences, you need to open the “Language & Region preferences” (Language & Text in previous OS X version.) The icon for this will look like a blue flag with an icon on it. In OS X Mountain Lion and Mavericks, this is in the top row and fifth from the left.

Note: Its positioning may be slightly different in older versions of OS X.

(Note: If you’re using Mountain Lion or a previous OS X version, you’ll first have to select the first tab to see this list.)

Also, remember to switch your region using the “Region” tab so that your Mac has the correct time and date.

How to Revert a Language Change Using Terminal:

If you’re having an issue with the method above, another option is to use Terminal in OS X to revert the system language. To do this:

2. In Terminal, simply enter the following command to delete the hidden global preferences file that holds your language settings.

Now, log out and back into your OS X account, and your language should be back to normal.

Shujaa Imran

Shujaa Imran is MakeTechEasier’s resident Mac tutorial writer. He’s currently training to follow his other passion become a commercial pilot. You can check his content out on Youtube

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Learn How To Install Smplayer In Ubuntu

SMPlayer is a free media player for windows and Linux with built-in codecs, which will additionally play YouTube videos, search and down load subtitles, and entails other points like a thumbnail generator and audio and video filters.

Features

Help for Youtube. That you can search, play and down-load Youtube movies

Many video and audio filters are available

Thumbnail generator

Video equaliser

It has many Skins/Themes

It supports a couple of speed playback

It supports audio and subtitles delay adjustment

Installing SMPlayer

To install SMPlayer, add the following PPA on Ubuntu−

$sudo add-apt-repository ppa:rvm/smplayer

The sample output should be like this −

Packages for SMPlayer. To install SMPlayer from this PPA, run these commands on a terminal: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:rvm/smplayer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install smplayer smtube smplayer-themes smplayer-skins Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it gpg: keyring `/tmp/tmpeab9bvoh/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring `/tmp/tmpeab9bvoh/pubring.gpg' created gpg: chúng tôi trustdb created gpg: key E4A4F4F4: public key "Launchpad PPA named smplayer for rvm" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 gpg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK

Now update the packages by using the following command −

$sudo apt-get update .................................................................................................

To install SMplayer with skins, use the following command −

$ sudo apt-get install smplayer smplayer-themes smplayer-skins

The sample output should be like this −

Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done The following additional packages will be installed: esound-common libaudiofile1 libdirectfb-1.2-9 libenca0 libesd0 libgif7 libqt4-opengl libqtwebkit4 libsdl1.2debian libvorbisidec1 mplayer smtube Suggested packages: The following NEW packages will be installed: esound-common libaudiofile1 libdirectfb-1.2-9 libenca0 libesd0 libgif7 libqt4-opengl libqtwebkit4 libsdl1.2debian libvorbisidec1 mplayer smplayer smplayer-skins smplayer-themes smtube 0 upgraded, 15 newly installed, 0 to remove and 284 not upgraded. Need to get 18.9 MB of archives. After this operation, 66.8 MB of additional disk space will be used. Do you want to continue? [Y/n] y .................................................................................

To open SMplayer, use the following command −

$ smplayer Usage: smplayer [-minigui] [-defaultgui] [-mpcgui] [-config-path directory] [-send-action action_name] [-actions action_list] [-close-at-end] [-no-close-at-end] [-fullscreen] [-no-fullscreen] [-ontop] [-no-ontop] [-sub subtitle_file] [-pos x y] [-size width height] [-add-to-playlist] -minigui: opens the mini gui instead of the default one. -mpcgui: opens the mpc gui. -defaultgui: opens the default gui. -skingui: opens the gui with support for skins. -config-path: specifies the directory where smplayer will store its configuration files (smplayer.ini, smplayer_files.ini...) -send-action: tries to make a connection to another running instance and send to it the specified action. Example: -send-action pause The rest of options (if any) will be ignored and the application will exit. It will return 0 on success or -1 on failure. -actions: action_list is a list of actions separated by spaces. The actions will be executed just after loading the file (if any) in the same order you entered. For checkable actions you can pass true or false as parameter. Example: -actions "fullscreen compact true". Quotes are necessary in case you pass more than one action. -close-at-end: the main window will be closed when the file/playlist finishes. -no-close-at-end: the main window won't be closed when the file/playlist finishes. -fullscreen: the video will be played in fullscreen mode. -no-fullscreen: the video will be played in window mode. -ontop: sets the stay on top option to always. -no-ontop: sets the stay on top option to never. -sub: specifies the subtitle file to be loaded for the first video. -media-title: sets the media title for the first video. -pos: specifies the coordinates where the main window will be displayed. -size: specifies the size of the main window. -help: will show this message and then will exit. -add-to-playlist: if there's another instance running, the media will be added to that instance's playlist. If there's no other instance, this option will be ignored and the files will be opened in a new instance. media: 'media' is any kind of file that SMPlayer can open. It can be a local file, a DVD (e.g. dvd://1), an Internet stream (e.g. mms://....) or a local playlist in format m3u or pls.

After this article, you will be able to understand how to install SMPlayer in Ubuntu. In our next articles, we will come up with more Linux based tricks and tips. Keep reading!

Source: SMPlayer Portal

How To Easily Transfer Contacts, Photos, And Videos From An Iphone To Another

Depending on your set up, transferring contacts, photos and videos from your old iPhone to your new one can be pretty simple. You might use iCloud to store all this data, in which case, your contacts and photos/videos will automatically come back once you sign in your new device. Or maybe you back it all up in iTunes, which allows you to sync all that data from your computer to your new iPhone. Maybe you don’t do any of that, and if you’re looking for a relatively quick and easy way to transfer all this data from one iPhone to another, then read on.

There definitely are several ways you can go about transferring content from one iPhone to another, and one I just found out about relies on an application by US carrier AT&T, called AT&T Mobile Transfer, a free download in the App Store. The best part is, you apparently don’t even need to be an AT&T customer to use this application.

In this post, I will show you how to use the AT&T Mobile Transfer app to move your photos, videos, and contacts from one iPhone to another. This is obviously pretty handy if you just got a new iPhone and want to transfer all this data without stressing too much about how to go about it.

1) Download the AT&T Mobile Transfer application on both devices (the iPhone you want to transfer From, and the iPhone you want to transfer To).

2) Make sure both devices are connected to the same Wi-Fi network.

3) Open the application on the old iPhone. Tap on the “From this device” button at the bottom of the screen. The application will briefly scan your device and ask permission to access your contacts, as well as your photo library. You obviously want to allow it access.

4) The app will now display a QR code, which will be used by the other iPhone (the new one). Keep this screen on as you move to the next steps.

5) Open the AT&T Mobile Transfer app on the new iPhone, and tap on the “To this device” at the bottom of the screen.

6) You will now be asked to enter your phone number. But if you aren’t an AT&T customer, fear not, because this step is virtually useless. Simply enter 10 digits, and you will be good to go. No need to enter an actual phone number. Tap Next to move to the next step.

7) The application will request access to your contacts and photo library. Again, you want to make sure you allow it access.

8) Now you will be able to scan the QR code that was presented to you in step 4 above. With your iPhone, aim at the QR code, which the app will quickly recognize.

9) You will now see some basic transfer options. You can choose to transfer all content at once, or selectively choose contacts, or photos, or videos. The app also gives an estimate of how long it will take to transfer all your data. For example, it would take about 49 minutes to transfer my 227 contacts, 1,606 photos, and 37 videos.

10) When you’re done selecting what you want to transfer, tap the Transfer button in the upper right corner. Transfer will then start. From there, you will just have to be patient, and make sure you don’t touch either devices until the transfer is completed. Note you can abort the transfer at any time by tapping on the Stop button.

Contacts should transfer in a matter of seconds, however if you have hundreds or thousands of photos and videos, it’s going to take a while. Just make sure not to quit the apps on both devices during transfer.

For alternative options, you can also read out post about how to transfer photos and videos from your old to new iPhone.

What method do you use to transfer your data to a new device? I personally like to start fresh and don’t transfer any photos. I just let iCloud take care of my contacts. Share your experience below.

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